this is

this is

A phrase said when introducing someone, followed by the person's name or their relation. This is Laura, my cousin. This is my friend Ben that I was telling you about.
See also: this
References in classic literature ?
And this is the reason why my three accusers, Meletus and Anytus and Lycon, have set upon me; Meletus, who has a quarrel with me on behalf of the poets; Anytus, on behalf of the craftsmen and politicians; Lycon, on behalf of the rhetoricians: and as I said at the beginning, I cannot expect to get rid of such a mass of calumny all in a moment.
For he certainly does appear to me to contradict himself in the indictment as much as if he said that Socrates is guilty of not believing in the gods, and yet of believing in them--but this is not like a person who is in earnest.
But this is what I call the facetious riddle invented by you: the demigods or spirits are gods, and you say first that I do not believe in gods, and then again that I do believe in gods; that is, if I believe in demigods.
I have said enough in answer to the charge of Meletus: any elaborate defence is unnecessary, but I know only too well how many are the enmities which I have incurred, and this is what will be my destruction if I am destroyed;--not Meletus, nor yet Anytus, but the envy and detraction of the world, which has been the death of many good men, and will probably be the death of many more; there is no danger of my being the last of them.
For know that this is the command of God; and I believe that no greater good has ever happened in the state than my service to the God.
This is true, O Athenians, or, if not true, would be soon refuted.
Well, Athenians, this and the like of this is all the defence which I have to offer.
This is the prophecy which I utter before my departure to the judges who have condemned me.
And the truth of this I will endeavour to prove to you.
For which reason, also, I am not angry with my condemners, or with my accusers; they have done me no harm, although they did not mean to do me any good; and for this I may gently blame them.
Of course, I can't explain who it is precisely that I am mortifying in this case by my spite: I am perfectly well aware that I cannot "pay out" the doctors by not consulting them; I know better than anyone that by all this I am only injuring myself and no one else.
Upon this I thought that he must be drunk, and told him so; whereupon he replied: "WHAT say you that I am?
Yet all this I knew before, in the weary days of my long sickness.
This is not unexpected, given the higher liability limits provided by the surplus lines carriers and the greater catastrophe exposures associated with their property book of business, which would require greater reinsurance to protect the balance sheet.
But this is still much too general, much too hortatory.