third person


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third person

1. In grammar, a class of pronoun (and its accompanying verb) that is used to refer to a person or thing other than the speaker or the listener. "He" is a third person pronoun.
2. In writing, a style in which facts or details are presented objectively. This style is used in both creative pieces (often so that the author is not limited to just one character's perspective) and in academic papers (where facts need to be presented without bias or emotion). This essay must be written in the third person because you are stating facts about historical events, not sharing your feelings about them.
See also: person, third
References in periodicals archive ?
From sentences (29)-(33), we can see that all the persons and numbers except the third person singular number (he) take have.
This study suggests that using the first person or the third person is one language choice that is involved in that mechanism.
Ego-Involvement and the Third Person Effect of Televised News Coverage.
In Thief: Deadly Shadows, gamers will be able to play in either third person or first person perspectives, and shift seamlessly between each on the fly.
Hoffman has noted, "One of the primary issues of scholarly debate has been the odd fact that benedictions tend to begin in the second person...but continue in the third person....
THE THIRD-PERSON RESPONSE: Able-bodied people will refer to you in the third person. In public places, the person standing next to me is often asked, "Where is the best place for her to sit?" or "What can I get for her?" or, my favorite, "Will she be comfortable here?"
The three main points of view are first person, third person singular, and third person omniscient.
Next, I draw your attention to the verb contributes which occurs in the following context: 'respiratory problems and rapid breathing contributes more to infant mortality.' Please note the inflection of that verb for the third person singular number as indicated by the final -s.
More qualitative measures are needed to explore the third person effect.
There are four different points of view used in fiction: first person, second person, third person and omniscient.
The pairs of sentences in (39)-(42) demonstrate that the distinctions we have pointed out between the verb forms that go with the third person singular subjects and all others do not apply in the past form.