think ill of (someone or something)

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think ill of (someone or something)

To have a poor or disdainful opinion about someone; to hold someone or something in low regard or esteem. I hope they don't think ill of me for leaving my job so suddenly. I could tell the board thought ill of my proposal.
See also: ill, of, think

speak/think ˈill of somebody

(formal) say or think bad things about somebody: You shouldn’t speak ill of the dead.
See also: ill, of, somebody, speak, think
References in periodicals archive ?
I held my breath, thinking about the pesticides, and felt ashamed for thinking ill of the military.
Accusing others along with thinking well of oneself is one of the evil consequences of thinking ill of others.
You don't like thinking ill of people but sometimes it is necessary to take sensible precautions.
Mr Jeremy asked: "Are you capable of thinking ill of Sharon Swinhoe?" Collins replied: "What she has done to me, making stories up, she's nasty.
Louis Menand, in his review for the New Republic, gave one possible reason for the book's success: "It gratifies our wish to think ill of our culture (a wish that is a permanent feature of modernity) without thinking ill of ourselves."
As Ramadan is aimed at promoting peace and spiritual strength, the fasts during this holy month is marked by abstention from cigarettes, alcohol, and thinking ill of anybody.
She would've gone with someone she knew because she naturally trusted them, thinking ill of no one.
And whenever I worried that Peter wasnOt attempting to repay me, IOd scold myself for thinking ill of him [ETH] no one would be cruel enough to borrow money and lie about paying it back, would they?
"On the other hand, I recognise that this is a debatable and complex question of art, and the suggestions that have been made that I 'disapprove' of the films, whatever their cinematic quality, even to the extent of thinking ill of those with whom I may differ, are wholly without foundation.
``On the other hand, I recognise that this is a debatable and complex question of art, and the suggestions that have been made that I `disapprove' of the films, whatever their cinematic quality, even to the extent of thinking ill of those with whom I may differ, are wholly without foundation.''
I would ask the Pope forgiveness for thinking ill of other people.
I didn't tell my kids as I didn't want to upset them or have them thinking ill of their father, which they almost certainly would have done.