think ill of (someone or something)

(redirected from think ill of him)

think ill of (someone or something)

To have a poor or disdainful opinion about someone; to hold someone or something in low regard or esteem. I hope they don't think ill of me for leaving my job so suddenly. I could tell the board thought ill of my proposal.
See also: ill, of, think

speak/think ˈill of somebody

(formal) say or think bad things about somebody: You shouldn’t speak ill of the dead.
See also: ill, of, somebody, speak, think
References in classic literature ?
Knightley, rather displeased; "I do not want to think ill of him. I should be as ready to acknowledge his merits as any other man; but I hear of none, except what are merely personal; that he is wellgrown and goodlooking, with smooth, plausible manners."
As their eyes met, she realized for the first time that she was talking to Ralph Denham, and she remembered, without recalling any details, that she had been speaking of him quite lately, and that she had reason to think ill of him. What Mary had said she could not remember, but she felt that there was a mass of knowledge in her mind which she had not had time to examine--knowledge now lying on the far side of a gulf.
First she was annoyed that there was no cab to free her from his company; then she recalled vaguely something that Mary had said to make her think ill of him; she could not remember what, but the recollection, combined with his masterful ways--why did he walk so fast down this side street?--made her more and more conscious of a person of marked, though disagreeable, force by her side.
'Those who speak or think ill of him, I will just pray for you here in Jerusalem.
Even if people think ill of him and He grieves at their hardness of heart, Jesus continues to serve and heal.
I suggest that what it additionally involves is a change of attitude towards a wrongdoer, which may involve ceasing to think ill of him, wiping the slate clean, coming to accept him despite his flaws, or (troublingly for Murphy) abandoning a demand for punishment.
Worried that I would think ill of him, he explained to me she was passing urine all over the house and, despite his constant efforts to clean up, the situation was intolerable.
could make the following pronouncement: "In cases of differences between ourselves and another there is nothing to do except in unimportant matters to think ill of him and in important ones to kill him" (qtd.
"But I don't think ill of him. He is still a good ref who gets internationals to officiate at so he must be rated highly."