think aloud

think aloud

To verbalize one's thoughts. A: "And I guess I should also pick up some plywood while we're out…" B: "Pardon me?" A: "Sorry, I'm just thinking aloud!"
See also: think

think aloud

Speak one's thoughts audibly, as in We need flour, sugar, butter-I'm just thinking aloud. [Early 1700s]
See also: think

ˌthink aˈloud

,

ˌthink out ˈloud

speak your thoughts about something, for example a problem, to yourself or to others, probably without organizing them as in normal speech: ‘What?’ ‘Oh, don’t worry. I was just thinking out loud.’
See also: think
References in classic literature ?
She never was abashed and is not abashed now, so she cannot be a bad woman!" He had often begun to make reflections or think aloud in her company, and she had always answered him either by a brief but appropriate remark- showing that it did not interest her- or by a silent look and smile which more palpably than anything else showed Pierre her superiority.
They received oral and written instructions on how to think aloud. Each TAPPS student was randomly assigned a listening partner.
There were 30 underlined words for which the subjects were asked to find equivalent in Persian without using any dictionary and had to mention how they guessed the meaning through a think aloud questionnaire.
To give the psychologist an insight into their cognition, participants will be have to think aloud whilst answering each question, after which they will discuss their experiences and the benefits they gain from walking.
The university instructor may "think aloud," or model the process of reflective thinking and writing in regard to the class session's topics or activities.
During my demonstration, I try to "think aloud" about my strategies to model the process of effective searching.
Although research suggests that thinking aloud is important during strategy acquisition, there is no evidence that students in general are better problem solvers when they think aloud (Montague, 1997a).
In addition, a number of studies involving problem solving under 'think aloud' and 'silence' conditions have shown that verbalization does not affect behavioural manifestations of thought processes, but only decreases the speed slightly of performance (Carrol & Payne, 1977; Ericsson & Simon, 1980; Karpf, 1973; Kazdin, 1976; Perkins, 1979 Roth, 1966).
The training and testing passages, the strategy questionnaires, the "think aloud" procedures, and the dependent measures were constant across conditions.
By engaging in several student think aloud assessment conversations over time, with a variety of authentic texts, teachers can gain additional feedback.
In this research, they used think aloud methods to better understand how interventions to improve readability affected student performance.
The students were encouraged to "think aloud" and give explanations for their selections so that we could identify any questions that the students were interpreting differently than we had intended.
The final benefit of this clinical experience was that the student teachers were motivated to think aloud and lead discussions of the student teaching experience.
This report provides information on the use of "think aloud methods" to detect design issues in large-scale assessments.
Since it is a think aloud protocol-based case study, the final sample of the present research consisted of 12 students in three different years (first, third and fourth) in the English language section at Benha Faculty of Education.