thick and fast


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

thick and fast

In quick succession and in large quantities. The work will pile up thick and fast if you don't stay on top of it throughout the day. After the presentation, the questions from the audience started coming on thick and fast.
See also: and, fast, thick

thick and fast

in large numbers or amounts and at a rapid rate. The enemy soldiers came thick and fast. New problems seem to come thick and fast.
See also: and, fast, thick

thick and fast

Rapidly crowding, coming so fast they run together, as in The questions came at him thick and fast. This term originated in the second half of the 1500s as thick and threefold and was replaced by the current version about 1700. For a synonym, see fast and furious.
See also: and, fast, thick

thick and fast

rapidly and in great numbers.
See also: and, fast, thick

ˌthick and ˈfast

quickly and in great numbers or quantities: Replies to our advertisement are coming in thick and fast.By midnight, the snow was falling thick and fast.
See also: and, fast, thick

thick and fast

Quickly crowding; in such rapid succession that they run together. This term began life in the sixteenth century as thick and threefold (“Thicke and threefold trends will flocke,” Timothy Kendall, Epigrammes, 1577). The change to “thick and fast” occurred about 1700 and definitively replaced the older term. Lewis Carroll, in his poem about the walrus and the carpenter (Through the Looking Glass, 1872), wrote about the oysters, “And thick and fast they came at last, / And more, and more, and more—.” See also fast and furious.
See also: and, fast, thick