take (something) in stride

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take (something) in stride

To handle or cope with something, especially something unpleasant, without a noticeable change in one's demeanor. You have to learn how to take criticism in stride if you want to be successful in this business. I didn't think she'd want to go back to work so soon after her mother's funeral, but she just took it in stride.
See also: stride, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take something in (one's) stride

Fig. to accept advances or setbacks as the normal course of events. She faced a serious problem, but she was able to take it in her stride. I'll just take it in stride. We were afraid that success would spoil her, but she just took it in stride.
See also: stride, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take in stride

Accept something as a matter of course, not allow something to interrupt or disturb one's routine. For example, There were bound to be setbacks but Jack took them in stride. This idiom alludes to a horse clearing an obstacle without checking its stride. [c. 1900]
See also: stride, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take in stride

To cope with calmly, without interrupting one's normal routine: taking their newfound wealth in stride.
See also: stride, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take it in stride, to

To accept circumstances as they are; to deal calmly with a setback, sudden popularity, or any other occurrence. This expression calls up the image of a horse clearing a hurdle without checking its gallop. It began to be used figuratively about 1900, as by Edith Wharton (The House of Mirth, 1905): “I’d want something that would look more easy and natural, more as if I took it in my stride.” A similar locution is take it as it comes—that is, accept whatever happens.W. S. Gilbert used it as an admirable philosophy in The Gondoliers (1889, “Life’s Tangled Skein,” Act I): “Life’s a pleasant institution, /Let us take it as it comes!”
See also: take, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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