take a leak

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take a leak

vulgar slang To urinate. Could you pull over? I need to take a leak.
See also: leak, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

take a leak

Inf. to urinate. (Crude. Use caution with the topic. Usually in reference to a male.) I gotta go take a leak. Back in a minute. He just went out to take a leak.
See also: leak, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take a leak

Urinate, as in Excuse me, I've got to take a leak. [ Vulgar slang; c. 1930]
See also: leak, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take a leak

INFORMAL, RUDE
When a man takes a leak, he urinates. I've got to take a leak, keep your eye on my drink, will you?
See also: leak, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

take a ˈleak

(slang) pass urine (= waste liquid) from the body: I’m just going to take a leak before we leave.
See also: leak, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take a leak

and take a piss and take a squirt
tv. to urinate. (Crude. Often objectionable. Usually in reference to a male. Leak is the mildest and piss is the strongest.) I gotta go take a leak. Back in a minute. We stopped at a rest area so old Harry could take a piss.
See also: leak, take
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

take a leak

Vulgar Slang
To urinate.
See also: leak, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take a leak, to

To urinate. This rather vulgar slangy term dates from the early twentieth century. A verse of the popular World War I song “Mademoiselle from Armentières” (1918; author of words and music not known) had it, “The proper place to take a leak/Is right on the corner of the main street.”
See also: take, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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