there you go


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Related to there you go: here you are

there you go

1. Here is what you needed or asked for; I present this to you. There you go, the complete works of William Shakespeare.
2. There you have it; that's the way it is. I know our political system isn't perfect, but there you go.
3. You're doing that well or correctly; nice job. There you go! I knew you'd get the hang of it eventually!
See also: go, there

There you go.

 
1. Hooray! You did it right! (Usually There you go!) There you go! That's the way! Good shot, Chuck! There you go!
2. That is the way things are, just like I told you.; Isn't this just what you would expect? There you go. Isn't that just like a man! There you go, acting rude and ugly!
3. You are doing it again. There you go! You said it again. I just told you not to put that junk on the table, and there you go.
4. Here is what you wanted. (As might be said by a food server in a restaurant when placing your food in front of you.) "There you go," said the waiter. Who ordered the fried shrimp? There you go.
See also: go, there

there you ˈgo (aˈgain)

used to criticize somebody because they are behaving badly again or saying the same things again and again: There you go again — as soon as we disagree you start shouting at me!There he goes again — always complaining about something.
See also: go, there

There you go

1. sent. Hooray! You did it right! (Usually There you go!) Good shot, Chuck! There ya go!
2. sent. That is the way things are, just like I told you.; Isn’t this just what you would expect? There you go. Isn’t that just like a man!
3. sent. You are doing it again. I just told you not to put that junk on the table, and there you go.
See also: go, there

there you go

A phrase with multiple meanings: you’re right, you’ve done well, here is what you ordered or asked for, here is your answer, and the like. This meaningless (or multiple-meaning) locution dates from the first half of the 1800s. It acquired yet another meaning when Ronald Reagan said, “There you go again” in a debate with Jimmy Carter during the 1980 presidential campaign. Reagan here meant, “You’re wrong again,” denying Carter’s repeated charge that Reagan was a warmonger. This usage, as a dismissal suggesting someone repeatedly says something wrong or misleading, has remained current.
See also: go, there
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