there's the rub

here's the rub

Here is the biggest problem or difficulty (with the situation being discussed). The phrase was famously used in Shakespeare's Hamlet (as "there's the rub") and is now seen in many different variations, including "therein lies the rub" and "that's the rub." All I need to do to get my car back is pay the fine, but here's the rub: my wallet is locked in the glove compartment.
See also: rub

that's the rub

That is the biggest problem or difficulty (with the situation being discussed). The phrase was famously used in Shakespeare's Hamlet (as "there's the rub") and is now seen in many different variations, including "here's the rub" and "therein lies the rub." A: "All you need to do to get your car back is pay the fine." B: "And that's the rub: my wallet is in my car."
See also: rub

there's the rub

There is the biggest problem or difficulty (with the situation being discussed). Seen in many different variations, including "here's the rub," "that's the rub," and "therein lies the rub," the phrase was famously used in Shakespeare's Hamlet. A: "All you need to do to get your car back is pay the fine." B: "But there's the rub—my wallet is in my car."
See also: rub

there's the rub

or

therein lies the rub

OLD-FASHIONED
COMMON You say there's the rub or therein lies the rub when you are stating what is difficult, impossible or unfair about a situation. If you are in a hurry, you can get straight onto the train and buy a ticket on board but you can only buy a single ticket — not a return — and there's the rub. She claims she is seen as `a ferocious, man-hating feminist' but therein lies the rub. Women often imagine they are being criticized when they are not. Note: This expression is variable and people sometimes use structures such as here's the rub or there lies the rub. When there are fewer orders, staff will work as little as 28 hours a week. When demand increases, workers will have to do an extra 10 hours. But here's the rub. They will get no extra cash for it. Note: This is from the well-known speech that begins `to be or not to be' in Shakespeare's play `Hamlet', act 3 scene 1, when Hamlet is wondering whether or not to commit suicide: `To die, to sleep; To sleep, perchance to dream. Ay there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come...'
See also: rub

there's (or here's) the rub

that is the crucial difficulty or problem. literary
This expression comes from Shakespeare 's Hamlet: ‘To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause’. In the game of bowls, a rub is an impediment that prevents a bowl from running smoothly.
1998 Times Even worse, and here is the rub, nobody could say who put what paper in which tier of whose red box.
See also: rub

there is/lies the ˈrub

(formal or humorous) that is the main difficulty: To get a job you need somewhere to live, and there’s the rub — I have nowhere to live and so I can’t get a job.This expression comes from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet.
See also: lie, rub, there

there's the rub

There’s the drawback; that’s the impediment. This term may come from the ancient game of bowls, in which rub meant some uneveness in the ground that hindered or diverted the free movement of the bowl. It was transferred to other kinds of hindrance by the late sixteenth century, but the term really gained widespread currency through Shakespeare’s use of it in Hamlet’s soliloquy: “To sleep; perchance to dream: ay there’s the rub: for in that sleep of death what dreams may come” (Hamlet, 3.1).
See also: rub
References in classic literature ?
"If passing over it were the only question!" interposed Kennedy; "but passing high up in the air, doctor, there's the rub!"
"Ay, there's the rub, Tom; one is obliged in our business to put up with the SECOND class.
He would rather lose even his picture than have the whole thing get into the papers; he has disowned his son, but he will not disgrace him; yet his picture he must have by hook or crook, and there's the rub! I am to get it back by fair means or foul.
There's the rub, the very point that campaigners are now trying to make is that women from Wales and across the world have and will continue to shape history - yet history has neglected the stories of these women over time, only coming to light years later if we are lucky.
And there's the rub. Gueye quit Aston Villa because he was offered the chance to jump back into the Asto th h Premier League with Everton.
But there's the rub, there really was NOTHING for me to do, and no-one to do nothing with.
I remember Conrado de Quiros, who compared Pacquiao to Muhammad Ali 10 years ago in his column 'There's The Rub.' According to De Quiros: 'Ali's greatest fight was with the US government.
Well, there's the rub. Food likes and dislikes are deeply ingrained in our culture.
And there's the rub. Boro's secret weapon has been firing blanks all season.
Not that a divorce law will make it easier to fall out of love -- aye, there's the rub; so easy to put the blame on divorce when it's matrimony haphazardly understood and undertaken that causes a breakup of hearts, homes, and families.
But, there's the rub. It's rumoured Apple is exploring ways to scale down costs by trying robots over Chinese workers.
Too many people, too much greed, and too much waste--aye, there's the rub. Some lab-grown protein for "the masses, or the poor" will only continue to feed this vicious cycle.
But, ah, there's the rub immediately, because my modem is almost certainly too old.
Ah, there's the rub. Our Prime Minister has, as we all know, promised to renegotiate the terms of Britain's membership and hold an in-out referendum in 2017 if the Conservatives win the 2015 general election.
Fans will be able to see the legendary band, who are renowned for albums including Argus, There's the Rub and New England, at Blackwood Miners' Institute on Saturday, October, 8 with doors opening at 7.30pm.
Full browser ?