there's many a slip twixt cup and lip

there's many a slip twixt cup and lip

proverb Even something that one feels confident will succeed can have disastrous problems before it concludes. "Twixt" is a shortening of "betwixt," an archaic form of "between." Everything seems to be going smoothly, but there's many a slip twixt cup and lip, so don't lose focus until we're over the finish line.
See also: and, cup, lip, many, slip, twixt
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip

. Prov. Many things may happen to prevent you from carrying out what you intend to do. Bob: Now that I have a contract with a publisher, nothing in the world can stop me from writing this book. Alan: Don't be so sure. There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip.
See also: and, cup, lip, many, slip
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

there is many a slip twixt cup and lip

LITERARY
If you say there is many a slip twixt cup and lip, you mean that plans often go wrong before they are completed so you cannot be sure of what will happen. The building is due for completion in September, but as they say, there's many a slip twixt cup and lip. Note: People sometimes just say there's many a slip, or change the second half of the expression. But there's many a slip twixt now and the eight or nine months it will take the company to design and reopen a new café. Note: `Twixt' is an old-fashioned word meaning `between'.
See also: and, cup, lip, many, slip, there, twixt
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

there's many a slip ('twixt cup and lip)

many things can go wrong between the start of something and its completion; nothing is certain until it has happened. proverb
See also: many, slip
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

there’s ˌmany a ˈslip (’twixt ˌcup and ˈlip)

(saying) (of plans, hopes, etc.) nothing is completely certain until it happens because things can easily go wrong: We should get to London before 7 o’clock, but there’s many a slip ’twixt cup and lip.She aims to get to the top in the company, but there’s many a slip...
The word ’twixt is a short form of the old word betwixt, meaning ‘between’.
See also: many, slip
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip, there's

Nothing is certain until one possesses it. This old proverb is thought by many to come from the ancient Greek legend of Antaeus, helmsman of the ship Argo. A slave told him he would never live to taste the wine from his own vineyard. As some wine from his grapes was set before him, he sent for the slave to show him his mistake, but the slave allegedly said, “There’s many a slip ’twixt the cup and the lip.” Just then a messenger arrived, telling him the Calydonian boar was destroying his vineyard. Antaeus jumped up, set down his wine, and went out to kill the boar, but was himself killed by the ferocious animal. Another writer believes the phrase comes from Homer’s Odyssey, in which Odysseus aimed an arrow at Antinous as he was about to drink some wine. The arrow hit him in the throat, and the cup fell from his hands before he could drink.
See also: and, cup, many, slip
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
If it's made - and there's many a slip twixt cup and lip - the pairing would be a dramatic late addition to a show already dubbed the most significant in our city for decades.
There's many a slip twixt cup and lip just as there are plenty of obstacles between now and Cheltenham in March, but the classy Flat-raced five-year-old Mijhaar looked a genuine supreme Novices' hurdle prospect with an easy debut win in the 2m1/2f novice hurdle here.
We should look at the old saying, 'There's many a slip twixt cup and lip'."
'Let's remain upbeat and remember the old proverb - there's many a slip twixt cup and lip.'
'It will take a colossal effort to make World Cup but remember the old proverb - there's many a slip twixt cup and lip'
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