thee


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Related to thee: three

company manners

Exceptional manners; those that are preferred or required in and among polite society. One must at all times exhibit company manners if one is to make a good impression among the more influential members of society.
See also: company, manner

to a fare-thee-well

1. To a state or condition of utmost perfection or completion. Her new house is absolutely gorgeous! They've designed it to a fare-thee-well.
2. To the greatest or furthest degree possible. After the economy crashed, the government began whittling down social welfare to a fare-thee-well. The home team trounced their opponents, beating them to a fare-thee-well.

claw me, claw thee

Help me, and I'll help you. A phrase used to describe a reciprocal relationship. After how much you helped me with the budget, of course I'll work with you to finish the project! Claw me, claw thee!
See also: claw, thee

fare thee well

The highest degree; perfection. Wow, you really played that part to a fare thee well—I'm so impressed!
See also: fare, thee, well

get thee behind me

A phrase used to rebuke temptation. The full Biblical phrase is "Get thee behind me, Satan." You know I'm on a diet, and you're offering me ice cream? Get thee behind me!
See also: behind, get, thee

ka me, ka thee

Help me, and I'll help you. The phrase is likely Scottish in origin. If you drive me to work today, I'll buy you pizza this weekend. Ka me, ka thee, right?
See also: ka, thee

company manners

One's best behavior, as in George never interrupts when we have guests; he has fine company manners. This term employs company in the sense of "guests." An older variant, Tell me thy company and I'll tell thee thy manners, uses company in the sense of "companions." The current term implies that one is more mindful of politeness with invited guests.
See also: company, manner

to a fare-thee-well

To the most extreme degree, especially a condition of perfection. For example, We've cleaned the house to a fare-thee-well, or He played the part of martyr to a fare-thee-well. This term first appeared as to a fare-you-well in the late 1800s, and the more archaic-sounding present form replaced it about 1940.

to a fare-thee-well

to perfection; thoroughly. US
This expression is of late 18th-century American origin, and is also found in the form to a fare-you-well .
1911 R. D. Saunders Colonel Todhunter The fight's begun, and we've got to rally around old Bill Strickland to a fare-you-well.
References in classic literature ?
"I have said all," quoth Robin, "and now, if thou wilt give me thy purse, I will let thee go thy way without let or hindrance so soon as I shall see what it may hold.
I have nothing to give thee. Let me go my way, I prythee.
They think much about thee with their circumscribed souls--thou art always suspected by them!
Even when thou art gentle towards them, they still feel themselves despised by thee; and they repay thy beneficence with secret maleficence.
As thou lov'st thy life, On thy aggressor thou would'st turn, no stay Debating, if the law would bear thee out.
THESEUS Show us the trail, and I'll attend thee too, That, if thou hast the maidens hereabouts, Thou mayest thyself discover them to me; But if thy guards outstrip us with their spoil, We may draw rein; for others speed, from whom They will not 'scape to thank the gods at home.
'em carry me to th' churchyard, an' thee not to follow me.
"I know thee dost things as nobody else 'ud do, my lad.
"What does thee want, father?" said Rachel, rubbing her floury hands, as she went into the porch.
"Now, thee doesn't say that, father?" said Rachel, all her face radiant with joy.
JOCASTA Let me too, I adjure thee, know, O king, What cause has stirred this unrelenting wrath.
Listen and I'll convince thee that no man Hath scot or lot in the prophetic art.
-- I tell thee, holy man, Thy raiments and thy ebony cross affright me!
Don Quixote gave himself a great slap on the forehead and began to laugh heartily, and said he, "Why, I have not been wandering, either in the Sierra Morena or in the whole course of our sallies, but barely two months, and thou sayest, Sancho, that it is twenty years since I promised thee the island.
First crept The Parsimonious Emmet, provident Of future, in small room large heart enclos'd, Pattern of just equalitie perhaps Hereafter, join'd in her popular Tribes Of Commonaltie: swarming next appeer'd The Femal Bee that feeds her Husband Drone Deliciously, and builds her waxen Cells With Honey stor'd: the rest are numberless, And thou thir Natures know'st, and gav'st them Names, Needlest to thee repeaed; nor unknown The Serpent suttl'st Beast of all the field, Of huge extent somtimes, with brazen Eyes And hairie Main terrific, though to thee Not noxious, but obedient at thy call.