the devil take the hindmost

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the devil take the hindmost

Each person must work independently toward their own success, as in competitive situations. The phrase is sometimes preceded by "Every man for himself." Increasingly, it seems like it's the devil take the hindmost during election season.
See also: devil, hindmost, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

devil take the hindmost, the

Let everyone put his or her own interest first, leaving the unfortunate to their fate. For example, I don't care if she makes it or not-the devil take the hindmost. This expression, first recorded in 1608, probably originated as an allusion to a children's game in which the last (coming "hindmost") is the loser, and came to mean utter selfishness.
See also: devil, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the devil take the hindmost

OLD-FASHIONED
If you say the devil take the hindmost, you mean that you should do what is best for you, without considering anyone else. Just get your laughs any way you can and the devil take the hindmost. Note: The whole saying every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost is sometimes also used. We do not believe in the theory of every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost. Note: `Hindmost' is an old word meaning furthest back or last.
See also: devil, hindmost, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

(the) devil take the ˈhindmost

(saying) everyone should look after themselves and not care about others: I like the way people here always queue up. Back home we just push and shove, and the devil take the hindmost!
See also: devil, hindmost, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the devil take the hindmost

Let each person follow self-interest, leaving others to fare as they may.
See also: devil, hindmost, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

devil take the hindmost, the

Too bad for whoever or whatever is last or left behind. The term comes, it is thought, from children’s games like tag, in which the person left behind is the loser. By the sixteenth century it had been transferred to out-and-out selfishness (“Every one for him selfe, and the divel for all,” John Florio, First Fruites, 1578). Beaumont and Fletcher wrote, “What if . . . they run all away, and cry the Devil take the hindmost?” (Philaster, 1608, 5.1).
See also: devil, take
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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