warrior ant

(redirected from the warrior ant)

warrior ant

A species of ant that is known to travel in armies and capture other ants. In today's class, we will study the behavior of the warrior ant.
See also: ant, warrior
References in periodicals archive ?
Of particular significance was an epic road trip through the Blue Ridge Mountains to see The Warrior Ant by Lee Breuer and Bob Telson at Spoleto [see article, page 26].
The central character, the Warrior Ant, is a well-meaning activist naif who may be a metaphor of Breuer himself.
Beaver Animation, to the 1987 extravaganza, The Warrior Ant. Indeed, a Lee Breuer piece - whether he wrote or directed it - is rarely complete without Maleczech on stage, whispering lines into a microphone.
It's been pretty well established by now (The Mahabharata, Les Atrides, The Warrior Ant) that the cross-cultural exercise doesn't give the funny bone much of a workout.
The third installation of a trilogy that includes The Shaggy Dog Animation and The Warrior Ant, An Epidog is the after-death account of a dog's life told through Japanese Bunraku puppetry.
Despite the inflated title, the project under development (which was on view at Richard Foreman's Ontological Hysteric Theater in New York City this past November) is a winningly modest piece of work, having little in common with the technological grandiosities of late '80s Breuer work like The Warrior Ant proper, Sister Suzie Cinema, or even The Gospel at Colonus.
Especially noteworthy are her glimpses of Fornes's remarkable skill at fostering a kind of dynamic immobility in her actors, an "active stillness," by urging them "to find that hollow, that space inside you, that place where I am when I write"; Akalaitis's fascination with the "mechanical" and the "utilitarian," and her "avoidance of interpretation" during the early part of the rehearsal process; Wilson's coaching actors with kinetic rather than psychological language, and his technique of creating structure not through naturalistic dialogue but by postulating "lines of force on the stage" (like "a diagram of a tennis match"); and Breuer's proficiency at "splintering" the title character of The Warrior Ant by using multiple impersonations: narrators, singers, dancers and puppets.