vale of tears

(redirected from the vale of tears)

vale of tears

Life or the world at large regarded as a source of sorrow, strife, or tragedy. I'm only glad that she is at peace and can leave this vale of tears behind. If you convince yourself that life is nothing but a vale of tears, you will end up creating a self-fulfilling prophecy.
See also: of, tear, vale

(this) vale of tears

Fig. the earth; mortal life on earth. (A vale is a literary word for valley.) When it comes time for me to leave this vale of tears, I hope I can leave some worthwhile memories behind. Uncle Fred left this vale of tears early this morning.
See also: of, tear, vale

vale of tears

the world regarded as a scene of trouble or sorrow. literary
This phrase dates from the mid 16th century; earlier variants included vale of trouble , vale of weeping , and vale of woe .
1997 Shetland Times Then by God's grace we'll meet again, Beyond this vale of tears.
See also: of, tear, vale
References in periodicals archive ?
What matters is not the tears he sheds but the vale of tears he leaves behind.
Like theirs, her style is deceptively simple and direct, and the vale of tears in which some of her characters reside is never so deep that a rich chuckle at a foolish person's foolishness cannot be heard.''
A few more steps along life's road, perhaps a few more years, then by Gods grace we'll meet again, beyond the vale of tears. Love and miss you - Gladys xxx DORAN Sean In loving memory of a dear Dad, Grandad and Great Grandad.
I FEEL somewhat displeased and dissatisfied with the Vale of Glamorgan Council at the present time (it might be rude though to describe them as the Vale of Tears Council).
On the first anniversary of the Hungerford Massacre the headlines spoke of The Town That Learned to Smile Again and Sunshine in the Vale of Tears.
Only in post-Biblical Hebrew literature does the phrase Emek Ha-bakha mean "vale of tears" and it is part of a verse--"Long have you dwelled in the vale of tears "--in the Friday night hymn, "L'kha Dodi." Also, a historical work by Joseph Hakohen depicting the sufferings of the Jews is called Emek Ha-Bakha (1558).
The fact that these ``bed-blockers'' have lived and loved through the vale of tears that has been Britain for the past 80 or more years, and in some cases have borne arms in defence of our country, cuts no mustard with those who ruthlessly enforce NHS targets.
Halfway through the volume the reader is introduced to a "we," implying the possibility of sharing one's fate, and in the title poem there finally emerges a "you." However, not until the memorial poem about Harding's own mother, overpowering in its agony and beauty, is a dialogue finally established, and here for the first time a way leading beyond the vale of tears is indicated: "you dress yourself in light / and get ready." This note of hope also resounds in the volume's closing lines, describing the poet's "waiting / for the telephone to be reconnected."