the street


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the street

1. A state of freedom, especially after incarceration. Sometimes pluralized. The notorious gangster is back on the street after technicality led to his case being dismissed. Some inmates have been locked up for so long that the streets feel more alien to them than prison.
2. A state of public consumption or usage. Sometimes pluralized. Police and federal agents have been working tirelessly to get the deadly new drug off the street. There are vendors all over this town selling their products on the streets.
3. A state of homelessness or joblessness. Sometimes pluralized. My estranged brother has been on and off the streets for the last five years. I've been living on the street for most of my adult life.
4. An informal shortening of Wall Street, referring either to the financial district of New York City or the United States financial industry as a whole. In this usage, "Street" is capitalized. He made his millions on the Street before retiring to Italy at 45.
See also: street

the street

1. n. the real, free world, as opposed to prison. The street just isn’t the same as stir.
2. n. Wall Street in New York City. (Usually capitalized.) The Street doesn’t seem to believe the policy makers in Washington.
See also: street
References in classic literature ?
Once on the street he was not at a loss as to the direction in which he wished to go, for he had tracked the two Europeans practically to the gate, which he felt assured must have given them entry to the city.
As he spoke, and drew Mr Haredale back, they had both a glimpse of the street.
His room was an attic and as he thrust his head out, up and down the street there were a dozen echoes to the noise of his window sash, and heads in every kind of night disarray appeared.
I do not love to hear of mobs and broils in the street.
The crowd had rolled back, and were now huddled together nearly at the extremity of the street, while the soldiers had advanced no more than a third of its length.
One of the men pointed into the street, and several of his companions laughed.
It was not a column, but a mob, an awful river that filled the street, the people of the abyss, mad with drink and wrong, up at last and roaring for the blood of their masters.
There are no street lamps there, and the law compels all who go abroad at night to carry lanterns, just as was the case in old days, when heroes and heroines of the Arabian Nights walked the streets of Damascus, or flew away toward Bagdad on enchanted carpets.
At that descent all the cars in the streets stopped with dramatic suddenness, and all the lights that had been coming on in the streets and houses went out again.
Moreover, for the purpose of thus following passers-by (and especially female passers-by) in the streets, which Gringoire was fond of doing, there is no better disposition than ignorance of where one is going to sleep.
When the streets were slippery with frost or snow that was the worst of all for us horses.
When driving about, he felt that he was held liable by the police for anything that might occur in the streets, and was the common prey of all energetic officials.
The street was small and what is called quiet, but it drove a thriving trade on the weekdays.
Wearing a waistcoat over his cotton shirt, Ferapontov was standing before his shop which opened onto the street.
If I had been astonished at first catching a glimpse of so outlandish an individual as Queequeg circulating among the polite society of a civilized town, that astonishment soon departed upon taking my first daylight stroll through the streets of New Bedford.