the sticks

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the sticks

The rural countryside, especially in a rustic or particularly unsophisticated area. Jane was sick of living in the sticks and dreamed of spending her life in New York City. What, are you embarrassed by your family from the sticks coming up to the big city to visit?
See also: stick

stick

1. n. a baseball bat. (Baseball.) He holds the stick up higher than most batters.
2. n. a pool cue. He drew the stick back slowly, sighted again, and gave the cue ball a sharp knock.
3. n. a golf club. These aren’t my sticks, and you aren’t my caddy. What’s going on around here?
4. n. the lever that controls the horizontal and vertical surfaces of the tail of an aircraft. The pilot pulled back on the stick, and the plane did nothing—being that he hadn’t even started the engine or anything. You pull back on the stick, which lowers the tail and raises the nose, and up you go.
5. n. a gearshift lever in a car. (see also stick shift.) I keep reaching for the stick in a car with automatic.
6. n. a drunkard. (Possibly from dipstick, shitstick, or swizzle-stick.) Get that stick out of here before he makes a mess.
7. n. a person’s legs. (Always plural.) He’s got good sticks under him, but he won’t use them.
8. and the sticks n. a rural or backwoods area. (Always with the in this sense and always plural.) You hear a lot about how things are in the sticks. They’re worse.

the sticks

verb
See stick
See also: stick

stick

to/by one's guns
To hold fast to an opinion or a set course of action.
References in classic literature ?
The crowd, of course, first cheer, and then chaff as usual, as he picks up his hat and begins handling the sticks to see which will suit him.
I must put the blood of the lamb on the head of the boy," Jesse muttered when the sticks had begun to blaze greedily, and taking a long knife from his pocket he turned and walked rapidly across the clearing toward David.
Each now brought a quantity of mud, with which he would plaster the sticks and bushes just deposited.
The sticks were jerked out of her, deckhouses splintered to match-wood, rails ripped off, and, after the worst had passed, the covering boards began to go.
The old man was transfigured as he reached avidly for the stick and received it.
I stood upon the hearth-rug and picked up the stick which our visitor had left behind him the night before.
The emperor holds a stick in his hands, both ends parallel to the horizon, while the candidates advancing, one by one, sometimes leap over the stick, sometimes creep under it, backward and forward, several times, according as the stick is advanced or depressed.
The governor lowered the staff, and as he did so the old man who had the stick handed it to the other old man to hold for him while he swore, as if he found it in his way; and then laid his hand on the cross of the staff, saying that it was true the ten crowns that were demanded of him had been lent him; but that he had with his own hand given them back into the hand of the other, and that he, not recollecting it, was always asking for them.
Before I could divine his plan, he was back at the entrance and savagely jabbing the stick in at us.
The stick prevented him from getting at the leather that fastened the other end.
To take care, in doing this, that one end of the stick shall be at the edge of the rocks, on the side of them which overlooks the quicksand.
Whosoever takes up the stick will be thrashed by the stick.
For many days, tied by the stick, Jerry remained Lamai's prisoner.
Saxon raised the stick as if to strike him, and he suddenly abandoned the bone, rolled over on his back at her feet, four legs in the air, his ears lying meekly back, his eyes swimming and eloquent with submission and appeal.
She roughly forced the stick into my hand; she turned her poor shapeless shoulders to me; waiting for the blow.