smoke

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smoke

1. n. a tobacco cigarette; a pipe of tobacco; a cigar. I think I’ll have a smoke now.
2. n. the act of smoking anything smokable, including drugs. I need a smoke—of anything. I’m going to stop here for a smoke.
3. n. methyl alcohol; bad liquor; any liquor. They call it smoke because when you mix it with water and shake it, it’s cloudy.
4. n. exaggeration; deception. (see also blow smoke, smoke and mirrors.) If the smoke is too obvious, they’ll just get suspicious.
5. tv. to annihilate someone; to shoot someone. (Underworld.) Rocko tried time and time again to smoke Marlowe, always without success.
6. tv. to beat someone in a contest; to outrun, outdistance, or outplay someone. Jill smoked Dave in the bicycle race.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Partner with smoke evacuation vendors to help educate the stakeholders about the smoke evacuation devices and equipment and the ease of use.
Firstly, in static characteristic a chromaticity-based decision function is employed to extract grayish pixels in the moving region and then a circumference-based disorder measurement in dynamic characteristic is developed to obtain the smoke pixels from the grayish pixels.
Now that doesn't mean you should physically disconnect the smoke generator system.
However, when a fire sweeps through, this litter burns up and the seeds respond freely to the smoke.
Even if you smoke in another room, the smoke will drift and people inside the house will be forced to breathe it in.
When lighting up a cigarette, it is courteous to consider that others may be forced to inhale the smoke and to take steps to avoid this happening.
Take a long, slow drag and let the smoke curl around your hair.
* You are hurting not only your own health, but the health of anyone who breathes the smoke, including nonsmokers.
Synergist packages for wire and cable formulations also significantly reduce the corrosivity of the smoke. Flame-retardant formulation technology provides high CTI values in both nonglass and glass-reinforced nylon.
"Because cigar smokers do not fully inhale a majority of the smoke when they light up," says Thomas Gibson, ALA president, "they deposit more secondhand smoke in the air around them." This secondhand smoke contains some 4,000 chemicals, 23 of which are poisonous and 43 of which are carcinogenic.
Currently, the regulations associated with the Clean Air Act classify the smoke from prescribed burning as a "human-induced" pollutant, while the smoke from wildfires is a "natural" pollutant.
And although the smoke is more dilluted, these compounds occur in smaller particles and, though the passive smoker breathes less smoke, the small particles tend to settle deep in the lungs, where it takes longer for them to clear.
Most of the smoke in a room results from sidestream smoke.
The purpose of my article today is to discuss the smoke smokers leave behind in closed spaces.