the silent majority

the silent majority

A majority of people who hold a certain opinion but do not state it publicly. Although the polls suggested the newcomer would be defeated in the election, the silent majority of the country apparently wanted her in office.
See also: majority, silent

silent majority

A group that makes up a majority of voters but does not widely express its views through marches or demonstrations. For example, They thought they had a convincing case, but they hadn't counted on the silent majority. This idiom was first recorded in 1874 but gained currency in the 1960s, when President Richard Nixon claimed that his policies were supported by a majority of citizens who did not bother to make their views known.
See also: majority, silent

the silent majority

The silent majority in a country or a group are the large group of people who do not express their opinions publicly. If he talks about a silent majority in favour of this, I think he is mistaken. His consistently poor judgment is a source of deep concern to the silent majority of party members.
See also: majority, silent

the silent majority

the majority of people, regarded as holding moderate opinions but rarely expressing them.
This phrase was first particularly associated with the US President Richard Nixon , who claimed in his 1968 presidential election campaign to speak for this segment of society.
1998 Spectator Independent-thinking columnists claimed a silent majority loathed Di mania and maybe they were right.
See also: majority, silent

the ˌsilent maˈjority

the large number of people in a country who think the same as each other, but do not express their views publicly: The government is appealing to the silent majority to support its foreign policy.The US President, Richard Nixon, used this phrase during the Vietnam War.
See also: majority, silent