the runs


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Related to the runs: diarrhea

run

1. verb, informal To leave or depart, especially very quickly or suddenly. Sorry, I've got to run. I'll call you tomorrow to go over the project in greater detail. A: "Do you want another drink?" B: "No, I'd better run. I have an early start tomorrow."
2. noun, slang A period of frequent and extended use of a particular drug; a drug binge. Usually used in combinations. It turns out he had been on a cocaine run for nearly three months straight, and he had spent almost all of their savings during that time. I nearly died on that last heroin run. This time, I'm doing whatever it takes to get clean.

the runs

slang A case of diarrhea. I get the runs when I drink too much coffee, so I tend to avoid it altogether. Something I ate has been giving me the runs all day.
See also: run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run

1. n. a session or period of time spent doing something; a period of time when something happens. The market had a good run today.
2. tv. to transport contraband, alcohol, or drugs. Harry the Horse used to run booze during prohibition.
3. n. an act of transporting contraband. Four soldiers were killed during a run.

the runs

n. a case of diarrhea. I can’t believe those cute little hamburgers could give anybody the runs.
See also: run
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

run

/take its course
To follow its natural progression or development: Should we let the illness run its course?
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the bike and the run, the course criteria to consider are similar.
Normally, these runs were longer than the runs that they had in their physical training classes.
Instructors told trainees to follow the yellow rocks along the way, and, soon, runners began calling the trail the "Yellow Brick Road." Over the years, participants coined names for some of the runs, such as the "Hump Run" and the "Belly of the Beast," based on the terrain.
Assume nothing." Practice will produce timing in the runs.