right to work

(redirected from the right-to-work)

right to work

1. noun The right of anyone who wants to work to not be prevented from obtaining employment. They can't block you from applying for that job—you have the same right to work as anyone else!
2. adjective (often hyphenated) Relating to laws that prohibit employers from requiring their employees to join a union. Primarily heard in US. They can't bully you into joining a union—that's what right-to-work laws are for.
See also: right, work
References in periodicals archive ?
The Republican majority leader spearheaded passage of the right-to-work law, arguing it would help the state's struggling economy by creating jobs, boosting manufacturing and improving the state's business climate.
With Scalia gone, the court lacked a majority in favor of the right-to-work concept.
But as the right-to-work movement spread nationally, its leaders began to notice that they had a commonality of interest with advocates of the liberal workplace constitution.
The right-to-work strategy, with legislation crafted by corporate lobbyists ALEC (the American Legislative Exchange Council), has weakened the union movement around the country.
Synopsis: Arguing that the decline in union membership and bargaining power is linked to rising income inequality, "The End of American Labor Unions: The Right-to-Work Movement and the Erosion of Collective Bargaining" by Raymond L.
The right-to-work debate is ongoing in states like Ohio and Wisconsin, and New Mexico and Kentucky may adopt those laws if Republicans win control of the legislatures in those states in the next election.
Historically, most of the right-to-work jurisdictions were centred in low-wage southern and southwestern states, where unions were unable (or unwilling) to organize during the heyday of union growth in the 1940s and 1950s.
The right-to-work issue has gained traction recently.
The right-to-work legislation passed in Michigan last week was a remarkable moment in U.
The right-to-work push by lame duck Snyder is seen, at least in part, as an attempt to weaken the Democratic Party in the state.
In a 58-41 vote by the Republican-dominated House to approve a Senate version of the law, Michigan became the 24th state to take a strike against organized labor with the right-to-work law.
The unweighted arithmetic mean for the right-to-work state was 1.
Using legal, sociological, and radical democratic theory and examples, this Note demonstrates that, counterintuitively, the right-to-work environment can strengthen unions instead of weakening them.
The right-to-work provisions have played a role in attracting the Slovenian manufacturing company Thmos USA.
Phil Gramm, R-Texas, in arguing for the right-to-work law, asked: ``Should a man or a woman in the greatest and freest country in the history of the world be forced to join a union to have a right to work?