rake-off

(redirected from the rake-off)

rake off

1. To clear a surface of something, especially leaves, with a rake. Would you go rake off the lawn, please? It's covered in dead leaves!
2. To clean, clear, or scrape something off of some area or surface with or as if with a rake. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rake" and "off." I need to go rake those dead leaves off the sidewalk. The mower doesn't have a bag to catch the clippings, so you have to rake off the grass by hand once you've cut the lawn.
3. To clear something off (of something) with a sweeping motion, as if with a rake. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "rake" and "off." She raked all the documents off the desk in a fit of anger. He took a large cloth and raked off all the dust that had accumulated on the shelf.
4. To make a profit from some illegal, inappropriate, or dishonest transaction. The mayor quickly resigned after it was discovered he was raking off money from the city's budget to help finance his gambling addiction.
See also: off, rake

rake-off

Profits made from a transaction, usually in an inappropriate, illegal, or dishonest way. The mayor quickly resigned after it was discovered he was taking a rake-off from the local cartel's drug sales.

rake something off (of) something

 and rake something off
to remove something from something by raking. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Please rake the leaves off the lawn. Rake off the leaves.
See also: off, rake

rake off

Make an unlawful profit, as in They suspected her of raking off some of the campaign contributions for her personal use . This expression alludes to the raking of chips by an attendant at a gambling table. [Late 1800s]
See also: off, rake
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of them have been keeping it themselves I understand, and others have been passing it on to claim farmers; thats people thats been directing these poor, sick, unfortunate, elderly miners to these solicitors, and theyve been having the rake-off. I think it is appalling.
But Premier League bosses are fuming about missing the rake-off they believe is rightfully theirs.
Or they used to say they were taking a certain amount for the "seamen's fund." Now the rake-off is so large, the players get less and less for winning.
And that's only a fraction of the rake-off harvested by at least three international gangs who turn each Grand Prix into a vast scam worth millions.
The rake-off is on top of pay rises for the show's new four-nights-a- week format from November.