the public weal

the public weal

The common good of public society; the welfare of the general public. Having ousted the dictator from power, the new president has pledged to focus all his energy on the public weal.
See also: public, weal
References in classic literature ?
"I don't advocate protection for the sake of private interests, but for the public weal, and for the lower and upper classes equally," he said, looking over his pince-nez at Oblonsky.
The question resulting is, whether small or extensive republics are more favorable to the election of proper guardians of the public weal; and it is clearly decided in favor of the latter by two obvious considerations:
This simple proposition will teach us how little reason there is to expect, that the persons intrusted with the administration of the affairs of the particular members of a confederacy will at all times be ready, with perfect good-humor, and an unbiased regard to the public weal, to execute the resolutions or decrees of the general authority.
But they thought the want of moral virtues was so far from being supplied by superior endowments of the mind, that employments could never be put into such dangerous hands as those of persons so qualified; and, at least, that the mistakes committed by ignorance, in a virtuous disposition, would never be of such fatal consequence to the public weal, as the practices of a man, whose inclinations led him to be corrupt, and who had great abilities to manage, to multiply, and defend his corruptions.
Here aforetime sat Neleus, peer of gods in counsel, but he was now dead, and had gone to the house of Hades; so Nestor sat in his seat sceptre in hand, as guardian of the public weal. His sons as they left their rooms gathered round him, Echephron, Stratius, Perseus, Aretus, and Thrasymedes; the sixth son was Pisistratus, and when Telemachus joined them they made him sit with them.
Deeply immersed in the intensity of his speculations for the public weal and the destruction of the INDEPENDENT, it was not the habit of that great man to descend from his mental pinnacle to the humble level of ordinary minds.
This was, indeed, an event which, in his ardour for the Saxon cause, he could not have anticipated, and even when the disinclination of both was broadly and plainly manifested, he could scarce bring himself to believe that two Saxons of royal descent should scruple, on personal grounds, at an alliance so necessary for the public weal of the nation.
"It was their place not to make debts," he said; and he considered his severity as a duty which he owed to the public weal. Rabourdin, on the contrary, protected the clerks against their creditors, and turned the latter away, saying that the government bureaus were open for public business, not private.
Corruption was not just morally reprehensible, but led to flawed decisions, because the basis of decision-making was not the public weal, but perpetuating corruption.
Regulations are supposed to safeguard the public weal, not private gain, at least in theory.
In a democracy, social institutions are supposed to be the pedestals on which the public weal stands mighty supreme.
(It is hardly a coincidence that many of them are also collectors of art.) What gets built is not infrequently a lie--their commitment to the public weal, to urban life, to architecture itself, all a convenient vehicle for their own enrichment.
Instead of his aspired public kudos in bagfuls, he has earned the people's consternation in heaps for the sloppy work done in a hurry to impress the masses with his government's capabilities to deliver and his own earnestness for the public weal and welfare.
We'll learn which strategy works best in the long run, but there is no doubt which one best serves the public weal. I'd rather be a newspaper reader in Buffalo, where Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway has owned the News since 1977, or in one of the other 26 cities where his company has recently bought newspapers, than in any of the cities in Louisiana, Alabama and Michigan where Advance is retreating from daily publication.
Franklin put emphasis on education for the purpose not only of personal intellectual fulfillment, but for serving the "Publick with Honour to themselves, and to their Country." "Nothing," Franklin subsequently wrote, "is of more importance for the public weal, than to form and train up youth in wisdom and virtue." That same year the Academy of Philadelphia, with Franklin as its first president, was founded, out of which evolved the University of Pennsylvania.