pink slip

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pink slip

A notice of termination from an employer. He was in total disbelief when he received a pink slip from his boss today, as he had worked at the company for over a decade.
See also: pink, slip

pink slip

1. n. a piece of paper giving notice of dismissal from employment; any dismissal from employment. I got a pink slip today. I guess I had it coming.
2. tv. to dismiss someone from employment. (see also pink-slipped.) They pink slipped the whole office force today.
3. n. a learner’s permit for driving an automobile. (In some U.S. states.) You can’t even drive in your own driveway without a pink slip.
See also: pink, slip

pink slip

A notice of job termination. The term, used mainly in the United States, originated in the early 1900s but there is no evidence that such a notice was written on pink paper. A holdover from when workers were paid in cash, the termination slip was included in the envelope with their wages, often unexpectedly. The New York Times ran an article by Frank J. Prial on June 18, 1991, stating, “Six thousand New York City municipal employees are getting ‘pink slips’ this week. In other words, they are being laid off.” But, Prial went on to say, their termination was announced not by pink slip but by telex.
See also: pink, slip
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the pink-slip provision died quickly, its passage and repeal remain relevant for anyone interested in the media, politics, the New Deal, income taxation, or simply a good tale.
The story of the pink-slip repeal contradicts a common criticism of the income tax--that it leads to a tyranny of the minority who "soak the rich." Very few Americans paid income taxes at that time.
Although many commentators initially believed that repeal was impossible, by 1935, the pink-slip law was abolished before it even went fully into effect.
Congressional opposition to income-tax publicity during the debate over the pink-slip provision echoed earlier anti-publicity arguments.
Whatever the reason, the resultant lack of attention may actually have facilitated the pink-slip provision's passage.
First, he sent Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau a petition from the Sentinels requesting that the pink-slip provision be repealed.
With tax returns due in less than two months, Pitcairn needed to quickly create a groundswell of popular support that would pressure Congress to repeal the pink-slip provision.
(95) But in 1935, the pink-slip campaign brandished the menace far-more forcefully and in a far-more-receptive atmosphere.
Although the pink-slip provision applied to all types of taxpayers, congressional opponents of publicity--like Pitcairn--focused on individuals, especially individuals with "small" incomes.
This did not occur, and the pink-slip provision was repealed less than one year after its passage.
(116) In March, just after the House passed the bill repealing the pink-slip provision, Morgenthau again repeated that the Treasury was strictly neutral (117)--despite what others were saying.
On June 19, 1935, shortly after repeal of the pink-slip provision, Roosevelt sent Congress a message proposing tax policies intended to decrease "an unjust concentration of wealth and economic power." (121) He recommended the enactment of inheritance and gift taxes, an increase on rates for taxpayers with more than one million dollars, a graduated corporate tax, and taxation of dividends received by corporations, and he urged the elimination of "unnecessary" holding companies through taxation.
Although the President never officially came out against the pink slip, by the time the Senate passed its version of repeal on March 28, his approval was "considered sure." (124) He signed the bill abolishing the pink-slip provision on April 30.
Where are these factory workers and bankers heading after the pink-slip lands?
Ironically, on the same day, when the pink-slips were being handed to the employees of the low-level IT company's branch in Noida, India, it hired similar amount of employees in its Islamabad-based branch.