the old days

the old days

The past; a bygone era. How did ladies wear these corsets in the old days? It's only been a few minutes, and I already can't breathe! In the old days, people respected their grandparents. These brats today won't put down their phones long enough to talk to anyone!
See also: days, old

the old days

a period in the past, often seen as significantly different from the present, especially noticeably better or worse.
See also: days, old
References in classic literature ?
In the old days, when men were allowed to have many wives, a middle-aged Man had one wife that was old and one that was young; each loved him very much, and desired to see him like herself.
The fellows were not bricklayers, but, as in the old days, they attended all Sunday picnics for the dancing, and the fighting, and the fun.
Also, he had money in his pockets, and, as in the old days when he returned from sea with a pay-day, he made the money fly.
In the old days one had noticed the hands and feet and deduced the presence of Joe somewhere in the background.
hasn't forgotten the old days,' she said, defiantly.
I am trying to recover my spirits -- I am trying to forget the poor deluded girl who was foolish enough to be fond of Frank in the old days at Combe-Raven.
In the old days she had dressed for her own sake to look pretty and be admired.
have taken over the administration of Crete on normal lines; and tourists must go elsewhere to witness the"debates," "resolutions," and "popular movements" of the old days.
I don't remember any offices in Russell Square in the old days, when Mamma lived there," Mrs.
Oh, Katharine," she exclaimed, "how you've made me think of Mamma and the old days in Russell Square
I like to hear about the old people of the old days.
I have a distinct recollection that in the old days, when you were about fifteen, you always could make me do whatever you liked.
I told her I was convinced of it, in the old days at school--and my conviction is as strong as ever.
This was in the old days when the Patricians alone governed Venice--the common herd had no vote and no voice.
She had been used to his subservience: he was only too glad to do anything for her in the old days, she was accustomed to see him cast down by a cross word and in ecstasy at a kind one; he was different now, and she said to herself that he had not improved in the last year.