the morning after (the night before)

the morning after (the night before)

A hangover. A: "Ugh, I feel so sick." B: "Sounds like the morning after the night before to me. Weren't you out at the bar last night?"
See also: after, morning, night
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

morning after (the night before)

a hangover; the feelings associated with having drunk too much alcohol. Do worries about the morning after keep you from having a good time at parties? She's suffering from the morning after the night before.
See also: after, morning
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

morning after, the

The unpleasant results of an earlier activity, especially overindulgence in alcohol. For example, A headache is just one of the symptoms of the morning after. This expression originated in the late 1800s as a synonym for a hangover (and was often put as the morning after the night before). By the mid-1900s, however, it was also being used more loosely for the aftereffects of staying up late.
See also: morning
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the morning ˈafter (the night beˈfore)

(informal) the morning after an occasion when somebody has drunk too much alcohol and is feeling tired, ill/sick, etc: She was suffering from the effects of the morning after.a morning-after headache
See also: after, morning
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the morning after

verb
See also: after, morning

the morning after (the night before)

n. a hangover. Do worries about the morning after keep you from having a good time at parties?
See also: after, before, morning, night
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

morning after, the

The generally unpleasant consequences of a previous action or activity. The term originated in the late nineteenth century and at first referred exclusively to the aftereffects of a drinking bout; it often was put as the morning after the night before. By the mid-twentieth century it had been extended to include the consequences of any prior action, although it retained the negative implications of a hangover. It is also used in the colloquial name for an oral contraceptive taken after intercourse has occurred, the morning-after pill.
See also: morning
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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