the more the merrier


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the more the merrier

More people will make something more enjoyable. This set phrase is used to welcome one to join a group or activity. Oh sure, you can come to the mall with us—the more the merrier!
See also: merry, more

more the merrier

Cliché the more people there are, the happier the situation will be. Of course you can have a ride with us! The more the merrier. The manager hired a new employee even though there's not enough work for all of us now. Oh, well, the more the merrier.
See also: merry, more

more the merrier, the

The larger the number involved, the better the occasion. For example, John's invited all his family to come along, and why not? The more the merrier. This expression was first recorded in 1530, when it was put as "The more the merrier; the fewer, the better fare" (meaning "with fewer there would be more to eat"), an observation that made its way into numerous proverb collections.
See also: more

the more the merrier

the more people or things there are the better a situation will be.
See also: merry, more

the ˌmore the ˈmerrier

(saying) the more people or things there are, the better the situation will be or the more fun people will have: Bring as many friends as you like to the party. The more the merrier.
See also: merry, more

more the merrier, the

The larger the number of participants, the greater the fun. This thought was expressed by Cicero, but the precise phrase first appeared in English as “The mo the meryer; the fewer, the better fare” (Jehan Palsgrave, 1530) and was credited by some to have been said first by King James I of Scotland (ca. 1423). John Heywood picked it up in his proverb collection of 1546, also indicating that “the fewer, the better fare,” meaning with fewer people there would be more for each to eat. Better fare was sometimes changed to better cheer, presumably meaning more for each to drink.
See also: more
References in classic literature ?
Jennings, "I am sure I shall be monstrous glad of Miss Marianne's company, whether Miss Dashwood will go or not, only the more the merrier say I, and I thought it would be more comfortable for them to be together; because, if they got tired of me, they might talk to one another, and laugh at my old ways behind my back.
THE more the merrier is the message Eoin Griffin is sending out before he opens the doors to Beacon Hill Stables in County Kilkenny, followed by an afternoon's racing at nearby Gowran Park racecourse next Saturday.
Cameras, the more the merrier, are all the rage, with some phone models boasting four to five built-in cameras.
Non-residents of Bede Village are also invited to attend our events, especially our charity fundraisers - the more the merrier!"
The More the Merrier Christmas Beauty evening at Selfridges Birmingham was the ultimate in old school festive glamour, from the Ratpack tribute duo doing their very best Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin to the complimentary mince pies and mulled wine served to every attendee.
The more the merrier, for there's plenty of room for them all.
Are one-person bands the way of the future, the more the merrier, or are they over-saturating?
``It's going all right both for the team and myself at the moment,and as far as records are concerned, the more the merrier. But picking up the points is the most important thing.''
Don't be afraid, pile them on - the more the merrier.
Father Tim Brook, at St Francis Church, Links Road, said: "Everybody is welcome - the more the merrier.
"The team spirit here is superb and rugby fans would be a most welcome boost- indeed the more the merrier."
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