meme

(redirected from the meme)

meme

A unit of culture transmitted from individual to individual, especially by some form of imitation. In common usage, the term refers to any individual piece of online content, usually an image paired with text, that circulates widely and spawns many imitations and variations. These cat memes are getting out of control.

plus ça change (plus c'est la même chose)

From French, meaning "the more things change, the more they remain the same." In English, the phrase is used in reference to situations or problems that remain the same, even when people or things involved in them are different. We move into a fancy new office, and still, the server crashes all the time. Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose. Plus ça change, eh? Even with the so-called champion of the working man in office, it's still the wealthy elite getting all the tax breaks.
See also: ca, change, la, meme, plus
References in periodicals archive ?
6) Shifman notes that memes, by definition, evolve: (7) Each new user adapts and adjusts the meme to her or his unique communicative purpose.
The meme is a beautiful tool to explain a concept and for students to express their knowledge on a topic and flex their critical-thinking skills.
The meme also draw disapproval from the Congress, BJP's Union Ministers and National Conference leader Omar Abdullah.
Personally, I like to see the meme as an interesting development in popular culture.
Of course it was not actually banned, but the meme twists the words of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 to fit the Islamophobes' discriminatory ideology.
If a brand fails to take the meme a step further or the campaign seems forced, it can all go horribly wrong.
The point of interaction between the meme rich environment that we live in and our body is the brain.
The meme is also a unit of information, formed in the brains of social animals like us through feelings and thoughts, which are then transmitted by body language and facial cues, as well as through language, both written and spoken.
While cats worldwide are no doubt thrilled at the digital attention they always knew they deserved, humans, and especially labour and social justice activists, might have reason to be wary of the meme.
The meme concept is an academic concept coined in 1976 by the biologist Richard Dawkins in his book The Selfish Gene.
The meme stems from TV commercials starring a loveable old lady trying to find a decent meat patty in a fast-food hamburger and promoting Wendy's restaurants.
Wrestling with this very issue in the same volume, Dawkins briefly introduced the meme as a way to conceptualize, if not fully explain, the presence, proliferation, and appeal of certain cultural themes and traits.
As memes exist in the minds of human hosts they possess similar constraints on their preservation-both within the individual-and within the meme pool which is comprised of books, recordings, and other storage devices.
Another candidate, though a more contentious one, would be the meme concept.
Enter the meme, memography, and embedded aboutness.