the little woman

the little woman

One's wife. John might be coming camping with us this weekend, but he has to run it by the little woman first.
See also: little, woman
References in classic literature ?
What could the little woman possibly mean by calling her a sorceress, and saying she had killed the Wicked Witch of the East?
But the little woman evidently expected her to answer; so Dorothy said, with hesitation, "You are very kind, but there must be some mistake.
There is nothing to be done," said the little woman calmly.
She was the Wicked Witch of the East, as I said," answered the little woman.
The little woman had been passing a long time with her sick mother in New York, and had left her home in St.
There was one little weazen, dried-apple-faced old woman, who took occasion to doubt the constancy of husbands in such circumstances of bereavement; and there was another lady (with a lap-dog) old enough to moralize on the lightness of human affections, and yet not so old that she could help nursing the baby, now and then, or laughing with the rest, when the little woman called it by its father's name, and asked it all manner of fantastic questions concerning him in the joy of her heart.
and such peals of laughter as the little woman herself (who would just as soon have cried) greeted every jest with!
Louis, and here was the wharf, and those were the steps: and the little woman covering her face with her hands, and laughing (or seeming to laugh) more than ever, ran into her own cabin, and shut herself up.
When they arrived home, the little woman made Pinocchio sit down at a small table and placed before him the bread, the cauliflower, and the cake.
For example, then, said the little woman, what species of gift did Monsieur desire?
said the little woman, laying the tips of the fingers of her two little hands against each other, that would be generous indeed, that would be a special gallantry
At last Becky's kindness and attention to the chief of her husband's family were destined to meet with an exceeding great reward, a reward which, though certainly somewhat unsubstantial, the little woman coveted with greater eagerness than more positive benefits.
Thus Rawdon knew nothing about the brilliant diamond ear-rings, or the superb brilliant ornament which decorated the fair bosom of his lady; but Lord Steyne, who was in his place at Court, as Lord of the Powder Closet, and one of the great dignitaries and illustrious defences of the throne of England, and came up with all his stars, garters, collars, and cordons, and paid particular attention to the little woman, knew whence the jewels came and who paid for them.
Perhaps the little woman thought she might play the part of a Maintenon or a Pompadour.
That night, there came two notes from Gaunt House for the little woman, the one containing a card of invitation from Lord and Lady Steyne to a dinner at Gaunt House next Friday, while the other enclosed a slip of gray paper bearing Lord Steyne's signature and the address of Messrs.