the late unpleasantness

the late unpleasantness

1. Any recent war, but used especially in reference to the American Civil War. The statue serves as a reminder of the late unpleasantness and the devastating effects it had on the community 150 years ago.
2. By extension, any recent controversial or divisive event or period. The book goes over the late unpleasantness of the last election, and the ructions it has caused across the country.
See also: late, unpleasantness

late unpleasantness

Euph. the U.S. Civil War. (Old.) The town courthouse was burned in the late unpleasantness. Many of my ancestors lost their lives in the late unpleasantness.
See also: late, unpleasantness

the late unpleasantness

the war that took place recently.
This phrase was originally used of the American Civil War ( 1861–5 ).
See also: late, unpleasantness
References in periodicals archive ?
He clearly had immigration on his mind when he wrote it, as well as the Late Unpleasantness and the Social Question (i.
It is one of those days during the late unpleasantness, sometimes called World War II.
It is unlikely that anyone with significant knowledge of the Army or the late unpleasantness in Southeast Asia, upon reading these two sentences, would respond other than with a scatological barnyard expletive or some more genteel utterance representing the same level of acceptance.
During the late unpleasantness in Iraq, there was nary a nationally known politician who spoke against the war.
It has been called the Uncivil War, the Brother's War, the Old Confederate War, and my personal favorite, the Late Unpleasantness.
The late unpleasantness in the Balkans and the long string of Arab-Israeli conflicts--to use Edward Luttwak's own examples of paradigmatic conflicts rudely interrupted by the frivolous motives of the West--were all inspired by territorial and genocidal inclinations.
No one who cares for the integrity of the founding principles of the Republic, in other words, can afford to be anything less than skeptical when the summons to war is sounded--most especially when it is sounded in the distinctively British-imperial tone of the late unpleasantness in Mesopotamia.