the king is dead, long live the king!


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the king is dead, long live the king!

A rapid succession of power has taken place. Allegedly this expression was used in France on the death of Charles VII in 1461, Louis XIV in 1715, and Louis XVIII in 1824. This allusion to the concept of royal succession, far less important in the present day, is now more often applied to other bastions of power—chief executives of large corporations, leaders of political parties, and the like.
See also: king, live, long