hold out

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hold out

1. verb To physically extend something to someone or something. Can you hold out a towel for me to dry my hands?
2. verb To refuse an offer or agreement, usually in order to wait for something else. I think they're lowballing me, so I plan to hold out for a better contract.
3. verb To remain in supply. How long do we think these drinks will hold out? Should I pour some more?
4. verb To maintain a defensive position. The police are going to broach this blockade eventually—we can't hold out forever.
5. noun One who is opposed to an offer or agreement. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word ("holdout"). We've still got some holdouts who are voting against this contract.
See also: hold, out

hold someone or something out (of something)

 and hold someone or something out
to set someone or something aside from the rest; to prevent someone or a group from participating. Her parents held her out of sports because of her health. They held out every player who had an injury.
See also: hold, out

hold something out (to someone)

to offer something to someone. I held a bouquet of roses out to her. I held out an offer of immunity from prosecution to her, but she would not cooperate.
See also: hold, out

hold out (for someone or something)

to strive to wait for someone or something. I will hold out for someone who can do the job better than the last person we interviewed. I want to hold out for a better offer.
See also: hold, out

hold out

(against someone or something) to continue one's defense against someone or something. We can hold out against them only a little while longer. Dave can hold out forever.
See also: hold, out

hold out

1. Extend, stretch forth; also, present or offer something. For example, He held out his hand and she took it, or The new policy held out promise of major changes in the welfare program. These usages date from the first half of the 1500s and of the 1600s respectively.
2. Last, continue to be in supply or service, as in The food is holding out nicely. [Late 1500s] Also see hold up, def. 4.
3. Continue to resist, as in The garrison held out for another month. [Second half of 1700s]
4. Withhold cooperation, agreement, or information, as in We've asked for a better deal, but they've been holding out for months. It is also put as hold out on, as in They were still holding out on some of the provisions, or He's not telling us what happened; he's holding out on us.
5. hold out for. Insist on obtaining, as in The union is still holding out for a better contract. [c. 1900]
See also: hold, out

hold out

v.
1. To present or proffer something as being attainable: I held a carrot out for the rabbit. The valet held out the keys for us.
2. To continue to be in supply or service; last: Our food held out during the blizzard.
3. To continue to resist: The defending garrison held out for a month.
4. To refuse to reach or satisfy an agreement: The union held out for three months without signing the contract.
See also: hold, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Germany, Sweden, Austria and France -- the most frequent final destinations -- have also been stepping up pressure on the hold-outs.
Most of the hold-outs oppose the idea of admitting a non-NPT state such as India and argue that if it is to be admitted, it should be under criteria that apply equally to all states rather than under a "tailor-made" solution for a U.
However, he said he won't chase the hold-outs forever.
Before dawn, security forces fired a series of ''warning blasts,'' ratcheting up pressure on the hold-outs to surrender.
Several of the hold-outs said they were working on the process.
The UK and France, which have both ratified the treaty, urged all the hold-outs to join.
Among the hold-outs, Indonesia said it "will submit its ratification in due time in conformity with its national ratification procedures.
As imported case goods have flooded the industry, Stanley has been one of the hold-outs, producing all its finished goods domestically.
If you look at the list of the hold-outs, it is mainly the countries that just might, in some remote but dreadful contingency, have to face a mass assault by motorised forces: US forces in Korea, Indian or Pakistani forces in the Punjab, the Israelis against Syria (although the Syrians would have to rebuild their forces first), and Russia and China mainly against each other.