the flip side (of something)

the flip side (of something)

1. The opposite aspect, possibility, or result associated with something. Of course, the flip side of integrating technology into so many aspects of our lives is that we run the risk of exposing our private information to cyber criminals. I'll have to work really long hours and be away from my family for long stretches of time, but, on the flip side, I'll get the opportunity to travel around the world.
2. The side of a record that is not currently playing. What's the flip side of that song you have on?
See also: flip, side

flip side

 
1. Lit. the "other" side of a phonograph record. On the flip side, we have another version of "Love Me Tender" sung by Sandy Softly. You really should listen to the flip side sometime.
2. Fig. another aspect of a situation. On the flip side, if we lower the taxes it may stimulate consumer spending.
See also: flip, side

the flip side of something

The flip side of something is its opposite, usually negative, effect. Perhaps the flip side of maintaining that privacy is that you don't show yourself the way you really are.
See also: flip, of, side, something

flip side

1. n. the “other” side of a phonograph record. On the flip side, we have another version of “Love Me Tender” sung by Beverly Mills.
2. n. the “other” side of something, such as an argument. I want to hear the flip side of this before I make a judgment.
3. n. the return trip of a long journey. (Citizens band radio.) See ya. Catch you on the flip side, maybe.
See also: flip, side

flip side

The other side of a 45 or 78 rpm vinyl record. The phrase was popularized by radio disc jockeys in the context of “. . . and that was Chuck Berry singing his latest hit, Roll Over Beethoven—and now let's hear the flip side, Drifting Heart.” When a song became a hit, its side of the record became the “A side” and the flip side was then referred to as the “B side.” Then CDs made As and Bs passe´.
See also: flip, side