fairy tale

(redirected from the fairy-tale)

fairy tale

1. noun A lie or fabricated account of something (likened to a clearly fictional fantasy story). I know he's telling me fairy tales to avoid admitting his mistakes.
2. adjective Resembling a fantasy story, especially due to being entirely positive or happy or having a happy ending. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. I really want a fairy-tale wedding, complete with a beautiful gown and a fancy cake. It wasn't some fairy-tale marrage, you know. We had our problems.
See also: fairy, tale

fairy tale

and bedtime story
n. a simplistic and condescending explanation for something; a lie. I don’t want to hear a fairy tale, just the facts, ma’am. I’ve already heard your little bedtime story. You’ll have to do better than that!
See also: fairy, tale
References in periodicals archive ?
If everyone can be "evil" and anyone a villain, then the fairy-tale conventions and structures become unstable.
Basile's "The Tale of Tales" and Its Afterlife in the Fairy-Tale Tradition.
The first three fairy-tales are ones I heard during childhood, in the spinning room and during the harvesting of the hops; "Little Ida's Flowers" on the other hand, came into being one day while visiting the poet Thiele, when I was telling his daughter Ida about the flowers at the botanical gardens; I kept and adapted a few of the child's remarks when I later wrote the fairy-tale down (2a).
Duggan, Queer Enchantments: Gender, Sexuality, and Class in the Fairy-Tale Cinema of Jacques Demy.
"Bobby Longbottom conceived of the cast beginning in modern clothing and changing into the fairy-tale costumes as they begin the show.
Queer enchantments; gender, sexuality, and class in the fairy-tale cinema of Jacques Demy.
Bacchilega makes the relevant observations that there is a widespread sensibility and increased awareness of issues of gender in fairy tales, which we see on and off of the Internet, and that the fairy-tale genre has a multivalent currency based on the contemporary proliferation of fairy-tale transformations.
At the same time, however, it struggles to define the fairy-tale world and the ordering of significant events in the novel clearly.
This background in the fairy-tale tradition influenced how Hawthorne turned the myths of the Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales into stories appropriate for Victorian-age children, overlaying on them a simple quest pattern that provides heroes struggles as well as happy endings (see "The Golden Fleece" and "The Chimera," for example).
Just as not all fairy tales have the same capacity to pass on information, many works outside the fairy-tale tradition are highly memetic.
Dragons, the fairy-tale element most strongly associated with Tolkien, appear in Lang's collections, and, paradoxically, they play both a small and a large role there.
In The Sisters Grimm: The Fairy-Tale Detective, Sabrina and Daphne Grimm have had to face the mysterious disappearance of their parents and a grandmother they never knew, but this is only the beginning of their problems: Granny reveals the girls have two famous ancestors, the Brothers Grimm, whose classic book of fairy tales is actually a real history book.
Dasgupta's stories, however, diverge from those of Chaucer in adopting the fairy-tale genre to enliven the narrative.
The tone is mostly light and humorous, with a few dark touches, as befits the fairy-tale world.
Bruno Bettelheim's essay, "The Struggle for Meaning" (376-391) appears to build, to some extent, on Max Luthi's essay "The Fairy-Tale Hero: The Image of Man in the Fairy Tale" (365-376).