the dismal science


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

the dismal science

A disparaging term for the discipline of economics, coined in 1849 by Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle as a label for the school of economists who supported the abolition of slavery. Economists have predicted that the exponential population growth will eventually cause our entire society to collapse in on itself—I suppose that is why they are known as practitioners of the dismal science.
See also: science
References in periodicals archive ?
Economics have been described as the dismal science, and it has reached the stage of being grim because of the plight we are in.
The students of the dismal science polled by the National Association for Business Economics forecast U.
Musgrave takes on Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science by Charles Wheelan.
Charles Wheelan (2003), author of Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science, writes, "The sad irony of Econ 101 is that students too often suffer through dull, esoteric lectures while economics is going on all around them.
Encouraged by Ayn Rand pabulum and the nostrums of the dismal science, the market is now the primary prism through which we understand our world.
BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS IS THE HOTTEST thing in the dismal science.
His steady-state economics is a subdiscipline that adds another "eco," as in ecology, to the issues that should most concern practitioners of the dismal science.
But amid the world's wild swings--between the crisis of the dismal science and the crests of political optimism--such an endeavor seems particularly timely.
While Alex Salmond was studying the dismal science - economics - in the academic birthplace of Thatcherism, I was studying natural science in the academic home of the enlightenment.
For us practitioners of the dismal science, now is the time to get happy.
As a practitioner of the dismal science, University of Oregon economics professor Tim Duy knows murky when he sees it.
Human goods, economic evils; a moral approach to the dismal science.
This isn't the usual economics tome, packed with neoclassical economic formulae that make the dismal science a dismal read.
Nevertheless, analogies between economics and biology have long been used and will continue to be seen in the dismal science.
Bernstein's book--and he is the sprightliest writer working in the dismal science since the heyday of John Kenneth Galbraith and Robert Lekachman--is one mid-length salvo at the dominant tendency in economic thinking, which denies any role for a collective response to a collective problem.