cutout

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cardboard cutout

A figure or shape that has been cut out of a large piece of cardboard, especially a life-size replica of a person or thing. I surprised my sister with a cardboard cutout of her favorite singer for her birthday.
See also: cardboard, cutout

cutout

A figure or shape that has been cut out of a larger surface. Often used in reference to a life-size cardboard replica of a person or thing. I surprised my sister with a cardboard cutout of her favorite singer for her birthday.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The cutout shows Prabhas dressed in an all-black ensemble, with a bruised forehead dripping blood.
The cutout for cameras is in line with the previously leaked image in which a protruded camera module is seen with three sensors.
The paparazzi captured the cutout of Steinbach photobombing John Legend in the background as he left the grocery store.
'We didn't get one speeder; all these people were braking before they got to the cutout or as they were approaching the cutout,' Chody said.
He said: "After several compliments and people getting scared by the cutout we didn't receive many trick or treaters for a while.
Shell R37, in addition to a cutout of 30 mm diameter, was strengthened by a reinforcement ply made from the same sheet in the shape of 20 mm wide ring, with outer diameter 50 mm, attached around the cutout. Shells R38 and R39 had 80 mm diameter cutouts with 20 and 10 mm wide reinforcement rings, respectively.
Turning the cutout page reveals the entire Mona Lisa painting!
The cutout is actually a picture of real MBTA Officer David Silen.
The 39-year-old said: "I thought it was hilarious when I heard about the cutout.
He said: "It has stopped shoplifting at the Co-op and the cutout has now been moved into the Post Office.
Turn the page and the cutout, now on the left, exposes its proper color.
The cutout interprets the symbolic journey of Daedalus' son (5) and depicts the fall of the mythologic adventurer from the azurean skies amidst "either stars or bursts of artillery fire" (perhaps reflecting the artist's consternation in the aftermath of World War II).
The experts then combined the cutout with a shot of the explosion, and made an instant stunt!