the beauty of

the beauty of (something)

The positive effects of something. A: "I'm finally feeling better after resting for a few days." B: "Well, that's the beauty of sleep."
See also: beauty, of

the beauty of

See also: beauty, of
References in classic literature ?
The modest converse of the shepherd girls of these hamlets and the care of my goats are my recreations; my desires are bounded by these mountains, and if they ever wander hence it is to contemplate the beauty of the heavens, steps by which the soul travels to its primeval abode.
Let any man go back to those delicious relations which make the beauty of his life, which have given him sincerest instruction and nourishment, he will shrink and moan.
Her chin had certainly its share in forming the beauty of her face; but it was difficult to say it was either large or small, though perhaps it was rather of the former kind.
To Shelley as a follower of Plato, however, the beauty of the senses is only a manifestation of ideal Beauty, the spiritual force which appears in other forms as Intellect and Love; and Intellect and Love as well are equal objects of his unbounded devotion.
He is, as we have implied, the great apostle of full though not unhealthy enjoyment of external Beauty, the beauty of the senses.
Hetty's was a spring-tide beauty; it was the beauty of young frisking things, round-limbed, gambolling, circumventing you by a false air of innocence--the innocence of a young star- browed calf, for example, that, being inclined for a promenade out of bounds, leads you a severe steeplechase over hedge and ditch, and only comes to a stand in the middle of a bog.
Plato writes in the Symposium that Diotima, the woman from Mantinea who educates the young Socrates in the ways of love, tells the seeker after Beauty to use beautiful things like rising stairs; to ascend from admiring the beauty of a body to the beauty of all bodies, from the beauty of bodies to the beauty of customs, from customs to learning, and finally to Beauty itself.
For example, Gregory Velazsco y Trianosky ("Savages, Wild Men, Monstrous Races: The Social Construction of Race in the Early Modern Era") argues that the American Indians encountered by European explorers fit neatly into neither the category of the solitary woodland Wild Man nor the category of the monstrous, the beauty of their bodies, remarked upon by the explorers, led to the creation of a new racial category, the savage.
The beauty of art therefore is ambiguous and depends on the way in which we respond with our freedom to its ambiguity: we can opt for its authentically spiritual orientation, or we can remain with a more equivocal vision.
In this way, through him, we can rise again, and the beauty of the world, which seemed to be and was destroyed, is resurrected through love.
Indeed, the beauty of Lascaux may tell us something about the meaning of the Bible story of Paradise, our first parents, and even the Fall.
How does one square the beauty of those towering lights as the lights rose into the cool Nurnberg evening, for example, with the store-bought light bulbs strung together by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, stirring souls as the lights flicker and die, one by one?
For it to sustain its relevance, a deep appreciation for the beauty of information will be vital.
Many books on the beauty of women were available to Vasari (Franco in 1542, Piccolomini in 1545, Dolce in 1545, Domenichi in 1549(12)), and some of them even discussed feminine beauty as ineffable, but none seem to contain the coded regola, modo, misura, disegno that signals Firenzuola as a probable source.