bag

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(one's) bag

slang Something one particularly prefers, desires, enjoys, or cares about. Often used in negative constructions. Thank you for the invitation, but long-distance cycling just isn't really my bag. I knew classic literature was your bag, so I thought you might like this book I found.
See also: bag

bag

1. verb To arrest someone. After trying to bag these guys for months, we were finally able to bring them into the station tonight.
2. verb To get or obtain something. Hey, when you go to that event, be sure to bag some cupcakes for us!
3. verb In medicine, to use a respirator bag to administer oxygen to a patient who cannot breathe on their own. OK, she's not breathing, so get over here and bag her!
4. verb To die. If you don't call 9-1-1 right now, this guy's going to bag!
5. noun Something that one enjoys. I feel so uncomfortable in a club like this—dancing just isn't my bag.
6. noun An unhappy and/or ugly woman. Oh, I don't listen to anything the old bag next door has to say anymore.
7. noun A quantity of drugs. How much does a bag of pot cost these days?

bag it

1. Literally, to put or take something in a bag, such as groceries or a meal. I'm completely full but the meal was delicious. Could you bag it for me? I'll take it for lunch tomorrow.
2. To cancel, abandon, or bring something to an end. After 20 years in the insurance business, I've decided to bag it. I'm going to live my dream as a photographer from now on!
3. Go away and leave me alone. You're really annoying me, so bag it!
4. Stop talking; shut up. Bag it—I'm sick of listening to you!
See also: bag

bagged

1. Arrested or apprehended. Well, I had to go down to the police station this morning because it seems that my son got bagged last night on his way home.
2. Drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really bagged!
See also: bag

bag it

1. Pack things in a bag, as in "Please bag it," the customer said to the checkout clerk. This usage mainly describes packing groceries or other purchases into a bag. [Colloquial; late 1500s]
2. Abandon something or someone, quit. For example, The class is not very good, so I've decided to bag it. This idiom first became widespread among students. [Colloquial; 1960s]
3. Be quiet, stop doing something, go away. For example, I've heard enough about that, so just bag it! [Slang; 1960s]
See also: bag

bag

1. tv. to capture and arrest someone. (see also bagged. Underworld.) They bagged the robber with the loot still on him.
2. n. an ugly woman. (Rude and derogatory.) Tell the old bag to mind her own business.
3. n. one’s preference; something suited to one’s preference. That kind of stuff is so not my bag!
4. tv. to obtain something. I’ll try to bag a couple of tickets for you.
5. n. a container of drugs. (Drugs. Not necessarily a real bag.) Two bags of H. for two dimes?
6. in. to die. The guy was coughing so hard that I thought he was going to bag right there.
7. tv. to apply a respirator to someone. (Medical. The respirator has a bag attached to hold air.) Quick, bag him before he boxes.

bag someone

tv. to put someone on a respirator. (To apply a medical device, part of which is a rubber bag, used to help someone breathe.) Bag this guy quick. He is struggling to get his breath.
See also: bag, someone

bagged

1. mod. alcohol intoxicated. How can anybody be so bagged on four beers?
2. mod. arrested. “You are bagged,” said the officer, clapping a hand on the suspect’s shoulder.
See also: bag

bag it

Slang
1. To cease participating in an activity: Finally in disgust I told my debating opponent to bag it.
2. To bring along one's lunch, as in a paper bag: I don't like cafeteria food, so I always bag it.
See also: bag
See:
References in classic literature ?
Passepartout nearly dropped the bag, as if the twenty thousand pounds were in gold, and weighed him down.
Don't you know that it is the bag of life and death?"
So when the day approached he put on his invisible belt, took a sack of gold pieces with him, and slipping into her room in the middle of the night, he placed the bag of gold beside her bed and returned to his sheep.
Let me go my way, and ye shall have all that's in the bag."
Presently he got the bag unfastened and plunged his hands into it.
The shepherd himself, though he had good reason to believe that the bag held nothing but flaxen thread, or else the long rolls of strong linen spun from that thread, was not quite sure that this trade of weaving, indispensable though it was, could be carried on entirely without the help of the Evil One.
This view of Marner's personality was not without another ground than his pale face and unexampled eyes; for Jem Rodney, the mole-catcher, averred that one evening as he was returning homeward, he saw Silas Marner leaning against a stile with a heavy bag on his back, instead of resting the bag on the stile as a man in his senses would have done; and that, on coming up to him, he saw that Marner's eyes were set like a dead man's, and he spoke to him, and shook him, and his limbs were stiff, and his hands clutched the bag as if they'd been made of iron; but just as he had made up his mind that the weaver was dead, he came all right again, like, as you might say, in the winking of an eye, and said "Good-night", and walked off.
"But how in the world is he to get out of the bag again?"
has risen out of the bag, all but his head, he's sure to topple over, one way or the other--the Law of Gravity secures that.
"Going to leave us already, sir?" he says, looking at the bag in my hand.
But he didn't like to leave his oatmeal outside for fear something would happen to it, because there were always mischievous boys around, so he hoisted the bag on his back and walked into church with it and right to the top of the aisle to Grandfather King's pew.
You have not seen the pack-horse with the bags under the shed yonder?"
When Planchet heard the provoking sound of the silver and gold -- when he saw bubbling out of the bags the shining crowns, which glittered like fish from the sweep-net -- when he felt himself plunging his hands up to the elbow in that still rising tide of yellow and white coins, a giddiness seized him, and like a man struck by lightning, he sank heavily down upon the enormous heap, which his weight caused to roll away in all directions.
Tarzan pushed Numa forward until his head was almost in the aperture, then as though it were an afterthought, he turned quickly and, taking the machine gun from the parapet, placed it in the bottom of the hole close at hand, after which he turned again to Numa, and with his knife quickly cut the garters that held the bags upon his front paws.
Pocket, Junior, delivering him the bags, One, Two, I saw the starting appearance come into his own eyes that I knew to be in mine, and he said, falling back: