artificial language

(redirected from the artificial language)

artificial language

A language devised for a specific purpose, such as computer programming. We need to develop an artificial language for this coding project.
See also: language
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way the impact of each mechanism on the artificial language can be shown.
By the seventeenth century, these categories were swiftly deteriorating and they were certainly highly fluid, so his lengthy exegesis on the religious and natural philosophical but not occult philosophical leanings of the artificial language movement seems forced.
Lewis could also have extended his argument to include the importance of colonialism in driving the artificial language movement.
Dr Lazarus Zamenhof invented the artificial language Esperanto in 1878.
On the contrary, the child could learn the artificial language as her mother tongue, like any other language.
When the author drops the artificial language of the sociologist, both she and the reader become engaged in the community she is describing.
Large, The Artificial Language Movement (Oxford: Blackwell, 1985)).
4 Kyodo The head of the world headquarters for Esperanto speakers is confident that the artificial language created in the late 19th century for better international communication will not die out in the coming decades.
I am also fortunate that a significant amount of my training was with John Eulenberg and Mort Rahimi of the Artificial Language Laboratory in East Lansing, Michigan.
Consequently, those descriptions could always be used to replaced the terms of the artificial language.
What do you get when you combine actor William Shatner and the artificial language Esperanto?
To create the artificial languages in her studies, Gomez mimics structure in natural language that may be useful in language learning.
The adult learners who had had little to no exposure to languages with word orders different from those in English quite easily learned the artificial languages that had word orders commonly found in the world's languages but failed to learn Verblog.
In Chapter 1, "Dalgarno, Wilkins, and Leibniz," Blank analyzes Leibniz's early views on the nature of metaphysical concepts from the perspective of Leibniz's responses to the artificial languages developed by George Dalgarno and John Wilkins; he claims that those artificial languages, including Leibniz's, are best understood as attempts to express structures of thought and reality and not simply as formal representations of basic definitions and axioms.
119) are representative of the artificial languages that flaw twentieth-century music.
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