the Hatfields and the McCoys

the Hatfields and the McCoys

Any group or pair of parties engaged in bitter feuding or infighting. Alludes to an infamous feud between two rural families along the border between Kentucky and West Virginia. The country's population is becoming more and more the Hatfields and the McCoys, as we drift further and further to the extremes of the political spectrum and demonize anyone on the other side. A vocal and influential group of programmers within the company were bitterly dissatisfied with the trajectory of the business, leading it to become something of the Hatfields and the McCoys for a number of years, before the programmers left to form their own company.
See also: and, McCoy

the Hatfields and the McCoys

A long-lasting and bloody feud. The Hatfields and the McCoys were two warring families who lived along the West Virginia-Kentucky border. The 1865 murder of a McCoy, a returning Union soldier, allegedly by a band of Confederate sympathizers was attributed to a member of the Hatfield family. The death sparked some thirty years of hatred and much bloodshed between the two clans, a situation that was hardly improved when a McCoy woman ran off to live with a Hatfield who ultimately abandoned her. As word of the lengthy feud spread across the country and for years after it was settled, the two sides became a metaphor for neighborly bad blood. When, for example, two families stopped talking when one chopped down a tree on the property line between them, others in the neighborhood were likely to refer to the situation as “the Hatfields and the McCoys going at it."
See also: and, McCoy
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hatfields and the McCoys are America's traditional example.
There are some employees who are as close as the Hatfields and the McCoys, but they put aside their dislike and focus their attention on doing their work.