the American Dream


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the American Dream

1. The belief that anyone can succeed (often with an emphasis on material gain) through hard work. The American Dream feels less attainable the more I am crushed by student loans.
2. The achievement of wealth and success. After years of hard work, we finally have a big house and successful careers. We're living the American Dream.
See also: American, dream

American dream

the idealistic notion that Americans are preoccupied with obtaining certain materialistic goals. The American dream of home ownership, a car in the garage, and a chicken in every pot started in the early thirties.
See also: American, dream

the American dream

COMMON The American dream is the idea that anybody can be successful in life, even if they are born poor. Part of the American dream is building a new business that creates jobs and financial independence.
See also: American, dream

the American dream

the ideal by which equality of opportunity is available to any American, allowing the highest aspirations and goals to be achieved.
See also: American, dream
References in periodicals archive ?
Yes there is, we put the limit,'' which I'll paraphrase as the American Dream being whatever you want it to be.
Missing from the study is a particular genre of films that distinctly reflect the idea of the American Dream.
Adams identifies the American dream as the defining factor of American history: "If America has stood for anything unique in the history of the world, it has been for the American dream, the belief in the common man and the insistence upon having, as far as possible, equal opportunity in every way with the rich one" (123).
The dreams of success and prosperity ingrained in the American Dream, were shattered.
However, the heroic era faded after World War H ended and, when peace eventually broke out, the American Dream quickly morphed into the almost uncritical acceptance of the astonishing material gains of the immediate post-war period.
More than half (58 percent) of those who make more than 50,000 dollars per year say they have achieved the American dream, while only a third of those who make under 50,000 dollars say so.
Critiquing this "American idealism" includes an interrogation of the American Dream and values.
Does the Constitution create the framework for the American dream which is contributing to a faster-paced modern world?
In particular, I am interested in exploring the class assumptions of the American Dream and the conflation of the American Dream with American evangelicalism as it impacts the ethic of evangelicalism.
My experience is not different from the hundreds of immigrants from Mexico and South America that come looking for the American dream.
Angela Rowan's idea of the American dream is having access to wealth, and that begins with owning a home.
While Europe's vision might play well in the blue states, your story fails to recognize that we're turning the American Dream into the American Nightmare.
The American Dream, warns Jeremy Rifkin, is on the ropes, thanks to "depleting resources, increased pollution, rising costs of production, spiraling inflation, low return on investments, escalating capital shortfalls and limits to technology.
That was one of the conclusions that emerged from a National Town Meeting on American Cities and the American Dream held last week in Washington, D.
Life might not be fair, Hatch asserted, but to ignore that unfairness would be to "chip away at the American dream.
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