that is to say

(redirected from that's to say)

that is to say

In other words; or, to clarify or explain more clearly. No, I have never met him—that is to say, we've never been formally introduced. I'll be there this afternoon. That is to say, after about four o'clock or so.
See also: say, that

that is to ˈsay

in other words: We’ll meet again three days from now, that is to say on Friday.
See also: say, that

that is to say

In other words.
See also: say, that
References in classic literature ?
"That's to say, you think there's a lack of something in me?"
"Cliff's Holiday" has been the name of it ever sin' I were a boy; that's to say, some said as it was the holiday Old Harry gev him from roasting, like.
All the facts they know can be explained two ways, that's to say I can turn their accusations to my credit, do you understand?
The State Oil Company said it is expected that the volume of transshipment from the terminal will be increased by up to 500,000 tons per year starting from 2019, that's to say, the volume of transshipment may increase by 500,000 tons of less from next year.
That's not to say Everton is not a great club, that's to say they are not Barcelona or Bayern Munich.
"That's to say if you do something bad it will happen to you."
That's to say Hibs went from finishing 11th to seventh.
"The Turkish economy will pick up in 2013, that's to say the growth will speed up," Mehmet Simsek was quoted as saying by the Anatolia news agency.
And that's to say nothing of the classic Disney tunes which were used by the wonderfully capable cast to bring the wishes of the princesses to life.
Now I know Richard likes to be mischievous, but I'm sure he understands perfectly well the difference between weather and climate - that's to say between unpredictable day-to-day fluctuations and long-term average trends.
That's to say, if anyone from here would want to go south to begin with.
That's to say, the dAcor is up to British touring if not Broadway standards.'
That's to say nothing of the uncomfortable conditions of call centre work, when a posted out form and face-to-face would suffice.
That's to say that It made a specific contribution in the context of the work being done at the time by Barbara Kruger, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine, and Cindy Sherman, for example.
That's to say, information assets, such as name brands, knowledge, the relationships with clients and with sup-pliers--factors that many companies do not value fully.