be child's play

(redirected from that's child's play)

be child's play

1. To be very easy or simple to perform. Oh please, I've been playing guitar for 20 years—that song is child's play.
2. To be insignificant. Those drafts are child's play compared to my latest one—I think I really have a strong argument now.
See also: play
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

child's play, easy as/that's

Extremely simple, easily accomplished. The earliest use of this simile appears in Chaucer’s The Merchant’s Tale: “I warne yow wel, it is no childes pley to take a wyf with-outen avysement.” It was probably a cliché by the time Thomas Carlyle wrote, “The craftsman finds it no child’splay” (Chartism, 1839).
See also: easy
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
As the BBC re-releases dozens of its hit series, we test your knowledge with a quiz that's child's play...
Lithography has come up with incredibly clever and complex ways of diffracting light to etch silicon wafers with details smaller than the wavelength of the light doing the etching - pretty incredible stuff - but that's child's play compared to the sorts of super-fast, super-complex communication that we would require inside a modern computer processor.
Among other things, the combination helped make Veronica Hamel of Hill Street Blues an Emmy bridesmaid five times running, although that's child's play compared with the 12 consecutive years, from 1985-96, that Angela Lansbury was nominated without winning for Murder (say it in Pat Summerall's baritone), She Wrote.
That's child's play compared to some of the stuff that I've done."
Sure, workers had to acquire an authentic American accent and become familiar with common US idioms and vernacular, but that's child's play compared to what they're facing on the European continent.
However, that's child's play compared to the Lupo ads, which featured a computer-generated baby with yellow eyes trying to escape from a hospital.
But that's child's play compared to 2003's "Capturing the Friedmans." Andrew Jareckie set out to make a documentary about one of New York City's most popular birthday-party clowns, and shifted gears in a major way when the man revealed he was a member of the Friedman clan, who were the focus of a notorious case on Long Island in the 1980s in which the father and another brother were accused of molesting dozens of children.