territory

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come with the territory

To typically accompany a certain situation; to be a usual consequence or related issue. When you're the boss, staying late at the office just comes with the territory. Sleep deprivation comes with the territory of being a new parent.
See also: come, territory

cover the field

To be thorough and comprehensive in what is presented or dealt with. This thesis will attempt to cover the field of English Law from 1950 to the present.
See also: cover, field

cover the territory

1. To travel to, deal with, or be responsible for a large, specific area. When I was a reporter, I had to cover the territory of the entire northern part of the state.
2. To be thorough and comprehensive in what is presented or dealt with. This thesis will attempt to cover the territory of English Law from 1950 to the present.
See also: cover, territory

go with the territory

To typically accompany a certain situation; to be a usual consequence or related issue. When you're the boss, staying late at the office just goes with the territory. Sleep deprivation goes with the territory of being a new parent.
See also: go, territory

on neutral ground

In a location or setting to which neither side (e.g., in an argument, competition, etc.) has a connection and therefore gains no benefit or advantage. I find couple's therapy to be helpful because it gives each partner a chance to air their frustrations on neutral ground. The peace deal between the two countries was brokered on neutral ground in the European capital.
See also: ground, neutral, on

on neutral territory

In a location or setting to which neither side (e.g., in an argument, competition, etc.) has a connection and therefore gains no benefit or advantage. I find couple's therapy to be helpful because it gives each partner a chance to air their frustrations on neutral territory. The peace deal between the two countries was brokered on neutral territory in the European capital.
See also: neutral, on, territory

poach on (one's) territory

To encroach on an area of land or part of a market that one currently controls or has jurisdiction over. The telecom giant has launched a legal campaign against the new service in an effort to prevent it from poaching on its territory. The indigenous tribe was awarded a huge reparation payment after a federal court agreed that the government had unlawfully poached on their territory for hundreds of years.
See also: on, poach, territory

the map is not the territory

A person or thing is completely separate from the judgments or perceptions that people place upon it. The phrase was coined by US semanticist Alfred Korzybski. I know you dislike Ed because of how he acted in that meeting, but you don't actually know him. Just keep in mind that the map is not the territory, OK?
See also: map, not, territory

uncharted territory

A situation or circumstance that is foreign, unclear, or uncharted and which may be dangerous or difficult as a result. We're starting to get into uncharted territory exploiting these tax loopholes. If we aren't careful, the government may crack down on us hard! John has always kept himself closed off from family members, so his real feelings have been uncharted territory for all of us.
See also: territory, uncharted

unfamiliar territory

A situation or circumstance that is foreign, unclear, or unfamiliar and which may be dangerous or difficult as a result. We're starting to get into unfamiliar territory exploiting these tax loopholes. If we aren't careful, the government may crack down on us hard! John has always kept himself closed off from family members, so his real feelings have been unfamiliar territory for all of us.

virgin territory

Completely unexplored or untested field(s) or area(s) of activity. The entrepreneur made his millions when he set up one of the world's most popular search engines back when the Internet was still considered virgin territory.
See also: territory, virgin

come with the territory

 and go with the territory
Fig. to be expected under circumstances like this. (Alludes to the details and difficulties attendant to something like the assignment of a specific sales territory to a salesperson. When one accepts the assignment, one accepts the problems.) There is a lot of paperwork in this job. Oh, well, I guess it comes with the territory. There are problems, but they go with the territory.
See also: come, territory

cover the territory

 
1. Lit. to travel or deal with a specific large area. The sales manager was responsible for all of the eastern states and personally covered the territory twice each year.
2. Fig. to deal with all matters relating to a specific topic. That lecture really covered the territory in only an hour.
See also: cover, territory

unfamiliar territory

an area of knowledge unknown to the speaker. We are in unfamiliar territory and I don't know the answer. Astronomy is unfamiliar territory for me, and I cannot answer any questions about the stars.

come with the territory

Accompany specific circumstances, as in You may not like the new coach, but he comes with the territory, or As the editor, you may not like listening to complaints, but it comes with the territory. This term uses territory in the sense of "sales district," and the phrase originally meant that traveling sales personnel had to accept whatever problems or perquisites they found in their assigned region. Today it is applied in many other contexts. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: come, territory

cover the field

Also, cover the territory or waterfront . Be comprehensive. For example, The review course will cover the field very well, or Bob's new assignment really covers the territory, or The superintendent's speech covered the waterfront on the drug problem. These expressions all employ the verb cover in the sense of "extend over" or "include," a usage dating from the late 1700s, with the nouns ( field, ground, territory, waterfront) each meaning "whole area."
See also: cover, field

go with the territory

If something goes with the territory, it is a normal and necessary part of a situation, so you have to accept it. If you're a world-class footballer, that level of media attention goes with the territory and you have to learn to live with it. Note: You can also say that something comes with the territory. If you're foreign, being misunderstood comes with the territory.
See also: go, territory

poach on someone's territory

encroach on someone else's rights.
See also: on, poach, territory

go (or come) with the territory

be an unavoidable result of a particular situation.
Territory is probably used here in its early 20th-century US sense of ‘the area in which a sales representative or distributor has the right to operate’.
See also: go, territory

on neutral ˈground/ˈterritory

in a place that has no connection with either of the people or sides who are meeting and so does not give an advantage to either of them: We decided to meet on neutral ground.
See also: ground, neutral, on, territory

ˌcome/ˌgo with the ˈterritory

be a normal and accepted part of a particular job, situation, etc: As a doctor, he has to work long hours and some weekends, but that goes with the territory I suppose.
See also: come, go, territory

comes with the territory

Is part of specific conditions or circumstances. For example, “You may not like dealing with difficult customers, but it comes with the territory.” The term, which originally alluded to traveling salesmen who had to accept whatever they found in their assigned region, or “territory,” soon came to be extended to other areas. It dates from the second half of the twentieth century.
See also: come, territory

go with the territory, to

To be a natural and unavoidable accompaniment to or consequence of a particular situation. Also put as to come with the territory, this expression dates from the second half of the 1900s. Originally “territory” referred to a sales district, and the phrase meant traveling salesmen had to put up with whatever difficulties or advantages they found in their assigned region. It soon was applied to other contexts, as in “You may not like the new supervisor but he goes with the territory.” Novelist J. A. Jance used it in Queen of the Night (2010), “It was a neighborhood where living beyond your means went with the territory.”
See also: go
References in periodicals archive ?
"In response to Armenia's territorial claims and military actions, the Council once again reaffirmed that the Nagorno-Karabakh region is an integral part of Azerbaijan, and demanded the immediate, complete and unconditional withdrawal of the occupying forces from all the conquered territories. A similar position was taken by other international organizations," he said in a message.
Ministers believe this will symbolise the close links between the UK and its territories.
Consolidated will acquire United-owned territories in South Carolina around the cities of Bluffton and Spartanburg.
First Nations regulations in the Northwest Territories differ from those of Yukon.
Within these unoccupied areas, we placed 18 random points (using GIS) to compare habitat characteristics between territories and nonterritorial sites.
Examples of such entities include: permanent observers at the United Nations, (55) territories under international administration, (56) and entities that, though affiliated to a particular state, have autonomy.
Because territory is made, it is inherently unstable--even if some formats, notably national territories, have enjoyed long lives.
By optimizing territories, that is balancing the workload or opportunity, across all territories while keeping them geographically compact to minimize drive time, sales forces benefit from more manageable territories, more motivated representatives, increased market share and revenue and reduced expenses.
The eight ungoverned territories investigated in depth were the Pakistani-Afghan border region, the Arabian Peninsula, the Sulawesi-Mindanao Arc, the East Africa Corridor, West Africa, the North Caucaus, the Colombia-Venezuela border region, and the Guatemala-Chiapas border area.
A: The United States has 14 territories, all located in the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea [see map].
The expanded sales team will be responsible for building and managing relationships within the financial advisor community in their respective new territories.
In simpler systems, sometimes referred to as protofarming, mollusks called limpets and certain damselfish graze in territories of edible algae.
The IRS realigned its Industries and territories to improve geographic congruency and increased the use of cross-Industry tax examinations as a way of balancing the workload across the various Industries and posts-of-duty.
Recently, however, the majority of Canadian provinces and territories have regulated the practice of geoscience, by law, for the protection of the public.