tend to

tend to

1. To focus or apply one's attention to someone or something; to take care of someone or something. You really need to tend to the lawn—it's getting pretty overgrown! I'm taking some time off of work to tend to my daughter while she is sick.
2. To be inclined or have a tendency to do something. Sarah has a lot more experience than me in this aspect of the business, so I tend to defer to her opinions on such matters. I tend not to believe rumors like these until I see some actual evidence.
See also: tend
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tend to do something

to have a tendency to do something. Jill tends to play with her hair while she works. Sam tends to say things like that when he is upset.
See also: tend
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tend to

1. Apply one's attention, as in We should tend to our business, which is to teach youngsters. This term uses tend in the sense of "attend." [1300s]
2. Be disposed or inclined, as in We tend to believe whatever we are told. This term uses tend in the sense of "have a tendency." [c. 1600]
See also: tend
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tend to

v.
To apply one's attention to something; attend to something: I must tend to my chores before I can go outside.
See also: tend
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
and then a midnight Mass, but it does tend to bother people if you separate the celebrations by language of culture.
Nowadays, however, classical musicians tend to rely on publishers and editors to fill in our scores, and thus we have the "great divide" in classical music between performance and composition.
In the absence of predators, the guppy lineages from the menacing steams didn't tend to die early, he and his colleagues report in the Oct.
On one hand, specialties tend to be high margin grades; on the other, they tend to be short run with fussy customers.
(7,9) Submandibular stones close to the hilum of the gland tend to become large before they become symptomatic.
Educated girls tend to marry at a later age and raise healthier, better-nourished children.
As people become less interested in and less focused on another person, they tend to angle their bodies away.
Thin TPE layers tend to surrender heat rapidly in the cold cavity, and the drop in temperature tends to reduce bonding strength.
In the process, these writers "took stock of what they tend to call the 'circumstances' of their faith," specifically, the "historical, imaginative, ritualistic, social, epistemological, and natural conditions in which English Protestantism tends to lapse, struggle, and thrive" (1).
Apparently, self-oriented perfectionists tend to set and to pursue rigid and unrealistically high standards for themselves, and to undertake stringent self-appraisal in an attempt to attain perfectionism and to avoid failure (Hewitt & Flett, 1991a, 1991b).
"Early exiters" tend to have had a courtship of around three years; after marriage they rarely go out together and tend not to work on the relationship, so they fail.
Feminist scholars tend to be critical of Victorian reform efforts, particularly those based on the penitential or home model, while scholars of social purity, particularly those based within a religious context, tend to ignore the coercive measures involved in the reform tradition.
Bush.) The other most-cited think tanks tend to be conservative ones like the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute.