tempt (one) to (do something)

(redirected from tempts us to)

tempt (one) to (do something)

To entice or allure one to do something. A: "Could I tempt you to join our company?" B: "No thanks, I'm very happy in my current job." The promise of adventure and a guaranteed job placement is tempting me to move to Japan to teach English.
See also: tempt, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tempt someone to do something

to entice someone to do something. You can't tempt me to eat any of that cake! I wasn't even tempted to go into town with the others.
See also: tempt, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
And yet there need only be a discussion and she has no words of her own but only repeats his sayings..." added Nicholas, yielding to that irresistible inclination which tempts us to judge those nearest and dearest to us.
He tempts us to surrender to mediocrity and settle for the easy life until we become prisoners of privilege and entitlement.
Though myself disgusted by the constant cussing and cursing of Du30 (masyadong masakit na po sa teynga), this is the kind of senseless provocation that tempts us to say-just to spite the hypocrites in our midst-'PI nyo!
"In many ways, the world tempts us to pursue blissfully ignorant lives of comfort, safety, and security for ourselves.
In the early stages, anxiety to please often tempts us to overlook irritating habits.
This manipulative technique tempts us to concoct our own innuendo--and never more so than in his sex pictures.
In an age when America's overwhelming military power tempts us to spurn the hard work of collaboration with other weaker and often chaotic states, it is important to remember the dangers and evils of imperialism.
A laissez-faire religiosity tempts us to treat our spirituality as a consumer identity in which we borrow various elements from the world supermarket of religions.
As the poet Robert Frost reminded us, there is something about a wall that makes us uncomfortable and tempts us to tear it down, but in the end, walls, like fences, make good neighbors.
The hubris that tempts us to try to dominate nature - rather than live in harmony with nature - blinds us to the consequences of our actions.
We have to learn to reject the liar who tempts us to feel lonely, rejected, and unworthy of love just because things rarely go according to somebody else's mistaken notion about the way life ought to be.
In his book Spurs or Nietzsche's Styles, Jacques Derrida works Uncle Friedrich's Jew-woman moment to comment upon "truth's abyss, as non-truth." He points out that while "truth" can only be a surface, or in quotation marks, it still flirtatiously tempts us to lift her veil and possess her.
Is the son's extravagant homecoming the kind of quick consolation that tempts us to minimize our failures so that we might commit them again?
just as the way of the world often tells us to treat those different from ourselves with contempt, it often tempts us to limit the scope of our love and concern for others.