tempest

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a tempest in a teakettle

A disproportionate reaction of anger, concern, or displeasure over some minor or trivial matter. (A less common variant of "a tempest in a teacup/teapot.") If you ask me, these protests are nothing but a tempest in a teakettle that's been stoked by a media campaign of misinformation. I really think you're making a tempest in a teakettle over this. It's just a tiny scratch on the car!
See also: teakettle, tempest

a tempest in a teacup

A disproportionate reaction of anger, concern, or displeasure over some minor or trivial matter. If you ask me, these protests are nothing but a tempest in a teacup that's been stoked by a media campaign of misinformation. I really think you're making a tempest in a teacup over this. It's just a tiny scratch on the car!
See also: teacup, tempest

a tempest in a teapot

A disproportionate reaction of anger, concern, or displeasure over some minor or trivial matter. If you ask me, these protests are nothing but a tempest in a teapot that's been stoked by a media campaign of misinformation. I really think you're making a tempest in a teapot over this. It's just a tiny scratch on the car!
See also: teapot, tempest

tempest in a teacup

 and tempest in a teapot
an argument or disagreement over a very minor matter. The entire issue of who was to present the report was just a tempest in a teapot. The argument at the office turned into a tempest in a teacup. No one really cared about the outcome.
See also: teacup, tempest

tempest in a teapot

Also, tempest in a teacup. A great disturbance or uproar over a matter of little or no importance. For example, All that because a handful of the thousand invited guests didn't show up? What a tempest in a teapot! This expression has appeared in slightly different forms for more than 300 years. Among the variations are storm in a cream bowl, tempest in a glass of water, and storm in a hand-wash basin. The British prefer storm in a teacup. The current American forms were first recorded in 1854. For a synonym, see much ado about nothing.
See also: teapot, tempest

a tempest in a teapot

AMERICAN
If you describe a situation or an argument as a tempest in a teapot, you mean that people are very angry or upset about it, but it is not really important and will soon be over. He said that the argument over the painting was a tempest in a teapot. He believed that the agency's clash with the company was, in effect, a tempest in a teapot and that they would take appropriate action to calm the agency. Note: The usual British expression is a storm in a teacup.
See also: teapot, tempest

tempest in a

teacup/teapot
A great disturbance or uproar over a matter of little or no importance.
See also: tempest

tempest in a teapot, a

A storm over a trifle; much ado about nothing. This expression has appeared in slightly varying forms for hundreds of years—a storm in a cream bowl (1678 letter from the duke of Ormond to the earl of Arlington), a tempest in a glass of water (the grand duke Paul of Russia, ca. 1790), a storm in a hand-wash basin (Lord Thurlow, ca. 1830), and, throughout much of the nineteenth century, a storm in a teacup (still preferred in Britain). In the twentieth century it changed to its present form, at least in America.
See also: tempest
References in periodicals archive ?
The opening tempest, with Prospero's choric follow-up, displays the magus's power via the tour-de-force acting and nonillusionist staging at Blackfriars and the Globe.
As with the tempest and the vanishing banquet, Prospero explicitly creates and controls each spectacle.
This dispersal of pagan deities (and of masque elements) in The Tempest makes us question the nature of its supernatural dimension.
In "The Tempest" as Mystery Play, Grace Hall offers a fully Christian reading.
How does each contribute to The Tempest's generic identity; and can they be integrated within a Christian sacerdotal reading?
(17) Yet The Tempest surpasses the Aeneid by resolving each of its tragic elements.
Philosophic Tragicomedy: Building on both the magical and the masque elements, a still more morally elevated genre is suggested by the thematic depth of Prospero's remarks and stagings, which resemble the Neoplatonic ideas of Plotinus, Iamblichus, and Ficino, who seek to transcend Nature's bodily restraints--thus anticipating Calderon's Life Is a Dream, notable heir of The Tempest. (20) Many who applaud this erudite dimension of the play sever it from Christian doctrine, citing the dark implications of magic art.
To reform the ship of state, seeking not simply revenge but conversion to moral health, Prospero's stagings form a coherent sequence of sacramental parodies: (1) The opening tempest resembles a communal baptism, though not equally received: to some a dreaded death threat, to others an awakening to deep bonds, and to a rare few like King Alonso, "a sea-change / Into something rich and strange" (1.2.403-4).
Many have noted The Tempest's generic synesthesia (tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy; satire, pastoral, romance; masque, morality, mystery play), a medley so ranging as to suggest the elusive "unifable" sought by James Joyce and Northrop Frye.
To fathom this transformation, consider Hall's reading of The Tempest as a Christian parable.
The diverse generic sources of Prospero's spacious identity all enrich the meaning of his "Art." Only twice does Shakespeare describe his power as "magic," precisely at the moments when he surrenders control of it: he lays aside his "magic garment" after the initial tempest, and at the end, before reclaiming his ducal role, he abjures his "rough magic." If Shakespeare's references to "magic" are thus limited and qualified, his use of "conjuration" is completely absent.
(44) Ariel, spirit of the air, voices musical, poetic "airs." Why, then, do many interpreters of The Tempest insist on restricting Prospero's powerful Art to questionable modes of Renaissance "magic"?
Demaray's study of The Tempest in Shakespeare and the Spectacles of Strangeness, is recommended to those who eschew most modern theoretical approaches to Shakespeare, whether new historicist, feminist or post-colonial.
Chapter 1 recapitulates sources and influences documented by most editors and source hunters of The Tempest, and particularly notes the prevalence of classical epic characters in selected earlier Italian, French, and contemporary English court entertainments.
The seemingly mis-timed stage direction, because it has been debated throughout the play's editorial history, is tantamount to proof for Demaray that The Tempest must have been written specifically for Whitehall and its superior special effects machinery.