temper

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fly into a rage

To become uncontrollably angry; to lose control of one's temper. Samantha flew into a rage when she heard that her brother would be getting the family's old car. I know you're upset, but there's no point flying into a rage like that. It was just an honest mistake.
See also: fly, rage

fly into a temper

To become uncontrollably angry; to lose control of one's temper. Samantha flew into a temper when she heard that her brother would be getting the family's old car. I know you're upset, but there's no point flying into a temper like that. It was just an honest mistake.
See also: fly, temper

hold (one's) temper

To refrain from becoming angered, enraged, or upset due to some provocation; to maintain control of one's composure despite being angry or upset. You're a good driver, but if you don't do a better job of holding your temper when other drivers make mistakes, you're going to end up causing a crash some day. It's hard to hold my temper with the kids after being kept awake by them all night long.
See also: hold, temper

keep (one's) temper

To refrain from becoming angered, enraged, or upset due to some provocation; to maintain control of one's composure despite being angry or upset. You're a good driver, but you need to do a better job of keeping your temper when other drivers make mistakes. It's hard to keep my temper with the kids after being kept awake by them all night long.
See also: keep, temper

lose (one's) temper

To become angered, enraged, or upset due to some provocation; to have an outburst upon losing one's patience. I'm usually a pretty calm person, but whenever I start driving, I find I lose my temper at the slightest inconvenience. When we were kids, my dad lost his temper a lot, but he's mellowed out since then.
See also: lose, temper

quick temper

A tendency to become angered, enraged, or upset very quickly or easily. I'm usually a pretty calm person, but whenever I start driving I find I have such a quick temper.
See also: quick, temper

short temper

A tendency to become angered, enraged, or upset very quickly or easily. I'm usually a pretty calm person, but whenever I start driving, I find I have such a short temper. That short temper of yours is going to get you into trouble one of these days.
See also: short, temper

temper (something) with (something)

1. To harden or strengthen some material through the application of something. The blacksmith tempers the metal with extreme heat followed by a quenching in cold water to make the blades incredibly hard. Our screen protectors are made of glass that has been tempered with a proprietary blend of chemicals.
2. To bring something to the desired physical condition by blending or admixing with something else. We temper the paint with oil to make it water resistant. The artist revealed that she tempers her clay with mica to achieve the unique sparkle in her pottery.
3. To use something make something else less intense, extreme, or severe; to moderate something with something else. We've got to temper investors' expectations with realistic projections of our growth potential. We tried to temper the news that their grandmother had passed away with a trip to an ice cream parlor.
See also: temper

temper tantrum

An extreme and childish display of unreasonable anger, frustration, or distemper. I can't believe you threw a temper tantrum like that just because I didn't want to go see some movie with you! Becca's been having really bad temper tantrums lately. I guess she's just going into the "terrible twos."
See also: tantrum, temper

temper temper

cliché Used to chide someone in a patronizing way that they need to control their temper better. A: "Get your hands off my property before I smash your face in!" B: "Temper temper, John! No need to start making threats." A: "NO! I don't WANT to go to bed!" B: "Calm down, Sarah. Temper temper."
See also: temper

tempers frayed

Things became tense among people; people lost their tempers. Tempers frayed at Thanksgiving when Uncle Stu and Aunt Marsha started arguing about politics.
See also: fray, temper

throw a (temper) tantrum

To have an outburst of childish or unreasonable anger, frustration, or ill temper. I was so embarrassed when Danny started throwing a tantrum in the grocery store. You're adults, not children, and throwing a temper tantrum every time something doesn't go your way is not the way to address things.
See also: tantrum, throw
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fly into a rage

Fig. to become enraged suddenly. When he heard the report, he flew into a rage. We were afraid that she would fly into a rage.
See also: fly, rage

keep one's temper

 and hold one's temper
to hold back an expression of anger. (The opposite of lose one's temper.) She should have learned to keep her temper when she was a child. Sally got thrown off the team because she couldn't hold her temper.
See also: keep, temper

lose one's temper (at someone or something)

Fig. to become angry at someone or something. Lisa lost her temper and began shouting at Bob. I hate to lose my temper at someone. I always end up feeling guilty.
See also: lose, temper

quick temper

 and short temper; short fuse
a bad temper that can be easily aroused. Tyler has a quick temper and doesn't mind letting everyone see it.
See also: quick, temper

temper something with something

 
1. Fig. to harden something, such as metal, with something. You have to temper the metal pieces with very high heat. The sheet of metal was tempered by the application of great pressure.
2. Fig. to soften the impact of something, such as news, with something. We can temper this disaster story a bit with a picture of the happy survivors. The news story was tempered with a paragraph of explanation and justification.
See also: temper
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hold one's temper

Also, keep one's temper. Refrain from expressing violent anger, maintain composure or poise. For example, Billy has to learn to hold his temper when he's frustrated, or If the chairman can keep his temper, the matter will get settled. [c. 1700] For an antonym, see lose one's temper.
See also: hold, temper

lose one's temper

Also, lose it. Give way to violent anger, lose self-control. For example, When she found out what Ann had done, she lost her temper, or He arrived without that important check, and then I just lost it completely. The first term dates from the early 1800s; the second slangy locution dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: lose, temper
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fly into a ˈrage, ˈtemper, etc.

suddenly become very angry: She flies into a rage every time anybody suggests that she should stop working so hard.
See also: fly

have a quick ˈtemper

become angry easily: Just be careful how you tell him — he’s got a very quick temper and he’s quite scary when he’s angry! ▶ ˌquick-ˈtempered adj.: She’s quite a quick-tempered woman.
See also: have, quick, temper

keep/lose your ˈtemper (with somebody)

manage/fail to control your anger: You must learn to keep your temper.He loses his temper very quickly if you argue with him.
See also: keep, lose, temper
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
She confronts her son, who explains that he is finding it difficult to control his temper after being released from prison.
They also quote verses from the Qur'an and Hadith that confirm Islam's aversion to displays of anger, and how as Muslims we must always keep calm and keep our tempers under control.
We have put up with your impatience, your hurtful words, nasty comments, volatile arguments, moodiness and temper tantrums that could last for days.
If your child's temper is alarming, easily ignited or aggressive, this book is for them--and for you.
"This was a very good test for us, not only on the football front but also in controlling our temper because there was clear evidence of simulation out there," said Davies.
Regionally, females in the West Midlands are ahead in the stress stakes, where 77% admitted to losing their temper with friends, family and partners and 67% said they snapped at work colleagues more often when the temperatures soared outside.
Closely following their lead in the bad temper stakes, just one per cent behind, are Londoners.
Uniform application of microwaves quickly, accurately and safely temper frozen foods using the Heat and Control / AMTek microwave tempering system.
And Midlanders are slightly more likely to do so than the national average, with 13% saying they lose their temper on a daily basis.
The survey, commissioned by the BBC, found people with school-age children are most likely to lose their temper - one in four say they do so every day and one in six consider resorting to physical violence when they do.
The Qaranicagi ceramics were analyzed using macroscopic characteristics of thickness, temper, firing core, hardness, and rim type.
A lot of people who have short tempers have told me it helps to put their energies into sports like swimming, running, aerobics and boxing.
"FIRSTLY, I would try and find out if there is a reason for the temper tantrums.
Temper Sands in Prehistoric Oceanian Pottery: Geotectonics, Sedimentology, Petrography, Provenance By William R.