tell fortunes

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tell fortunes

To (profess to) anticipate, and inform about, future outcomes or see what future events will take place. There's this old lady in the apartment next to mine who tells fortunes for ten bucks. I never go in for stuff like that, but I'll admit that I'm a bit curious.
See also: fortune, tell
References in classic literature ?
They tackled missionarying, and mesmeriz- ing, and doctoring, and telling fortunes, and a little of everything; but they couldn't seem to have no luck.
'Shall I tell your fortune for the journey, Arkady Ivanovitch?' She was a great hand at telling fortunes. I shall never forgive myself for not asking her to.
Ham, who had been giving me my first lesson in all-fours, was trying to recollect a scheme of telling fortunes with the dirty cards, and was printing off fishy impressions of his thumb on all the cards he turned.
Readers will catch a glimpse of Cuba's rolling mountains and hills on the road to Playa Rancho Luna; Adelaida telling fortunes in the street; and boxing practice in a vacant lot, in La Habana Vieja.
The musical tale begins in the hills of Russia, with an old woman telling fortunes as young girls assemble and perform dances in honor of the spring.
He remembers that Ali warned the astrologers to cease telling fortunes
The 27-year-old schlepped through 100 different jobs during 2012, from distributing flyers to data entry to telling fortunes.
Mayhem ensues as the family arrives in Great Toadpool to discover that the help required involves such feats as swinging from a trapeze, walking on stilts, riding a unicycle and telling fortunes, skills in which none of them have any expertise.
"Present Tense" tells of an unemployed, lonely and unhappy woman in ystanbul who tries to save money by telling fortunes in order to go to America to start a new life.
At Baladi restaurant in Jeita, Nadya Baroud says she considers her work telling fortunes to be chosen for her from God.
Section 365 of the Criminal Code describes the offence of fraudulently "pretending" to practice witchcraft, sorcery, enchantment or conjuration; telling fortunes, and attempting to locate stolen or lost property by using "skill in or knowledge of an occult or crafty science.
On the bridge, a man is telling fortunes - a bird in a cage hops out and picks out a bit of paper with your fortune neatly typed out - a cryptic paragraph with a dire warning about some accident or misfortune.
Cynthia hardly recognises Harry and Dorothy pictured in their youth in the 1930s and in the poem Telling Fortunes writes: "no lines yet, all their teeth and hair, and happy, in droopy woollen swimsuits at Whitley Bay."
Mr Dickinson also spoke of having a police gun fired at him during a midnight pursuit, and telling fortunes on the streets of Istanbul to make ends meet.
She can see the threads, and makes money telling fortunes at her high school.