telegraph


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jungle telegraph

An informal means of communication or information, especially gossip. Used most commonly in the phrase "hear (something) on the jungle telegraph." (Analogous to "hear (something) through the grapevine.") Primarily heard in UK. I heard on the jungle telegraph that Stacy and Mark are getting a divorce! A: "How do you know the company is going bust?" B: "I heard it on the jungle telegraph."
See also: jungle, telegraph

hear (something) on the jungle telegraph

To hear or learn a something through an informal means of communication, especially gossip. Primarily heard in UK. I heard on the jungle telegraph that Stacy and Mark are getting a divorce! A: "How do you know the company is going bust?" B: "I heard it on the jungle telegraph."
See also: hear, jungle, on, telegraph

the bush telegraph

Word of mouth; the grapevine. Don't expect that to stay a secret in this office—the bush telegraph is swift around here.
See also: bush, telegraph

telegraph one's punches

 
1. Fig. to signal, unintentionally, what blows one is about to strike. (Boxing.) Wilbur used to telegraph his punches until his trainer worked with him. Don't telegraph your punches, kid! You'll be flat on your back in twenty seconds.
2. Fig. to signal, unintentionally, one's intentions. When you go in there to negotiate, don't telegraph your punches. Don't let them see that we're in need of this contract. The mediator telegraphed his punches, and we were prepared with a strong counterargument.
See also: punch, telegraph

the bush telegraph

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
The bush telegraph is the way in which information or news is passed from person to person in conversation. No, you didn't tell me, but I heard it on the bush telegraph. Jean-Michel had heard of our impending arrival in Conflans long before we got there. The bush telegraph on the waterways is extremely effective. Note: This expression refers to a primitive method of communication where people scattered over a wide area beat drums to send messages to one another.
See also: bush, telegraph

bush telegraph

a rapid informal spreading of information or rumour; the network through which this takes place.
This expression originated in the late 19th century, referring to the network of informers who kept bushrangers informed about the movements of the police in the Australian bush or outback. Compare with hear something on the grapevine (at grapevine).
See also: bush, telegraph

ˌbush ˈtelegraph

the spreading of news quickly from one person to another: Everyone knew about it before it was officially announced: the bush telegraph had been at work again. Bush in this phrase refers to the areas of wild land in Australia. Bush telegraph originally meant the people who informed bushrangers (= criminals who lived in the bush) about the movements of the police.
See also: bush, telegraph

telegraph one’s punches

1. tv. to signal, unintentionally, what blows one is about to strike. (Boxing.) Don’t telegraph your punches, kid! You’ll be flat on your back in twenty seconds.
2. tv. to signal, unintentionally, one’s intentions. The mediator telegraphed his punches, and we were prepared with a strong counter argument.
See also: punch, telegraph
References in periodicals archive ?
William Lewis, Editor-in-Chief, Telegraph Media Group, said:
Commercial telegraph companies often benefitted from railroad systems paralleling their own circuits.
The statement from the Trust acknowledged the tough decision the Telegraph made in launching the petition last Tuesday calling for Sisu to sell up, which now has more than 15,000 signatures.
Andrew Gilligan is London editor for the Sunday Telegraph.
It has been placing what it perceives to be the interests of a major international bank above its duty to bring the news to Telegraph readers.
The British Telegraph Tower was originally built in the late 19th Century as the first commercial center of the East India Company in Bandar-e Jask.
Quantity: Lot # 1-Equipment electrical for wired telephone or telegraph communication; videophones (primary multiplexer BKO-60 m 2E1 = 60 KTC (or equivalent)-5 units).
Yusef noticed an unusual movement of the magnetic needle of his telegraph instrument and while other telegraph operators during the late 1800s and early 1900s noticed the phenomenon, he proposed an earthquake early warning system.
The British Department for International Development (DfID) funds British consultants, many of whom, The Telegraph believes, are "on six- or even seven- figure personal incomes paid in large by the aid budget.
The Telegraph - published by BPM Media, the same group as the Birmingham Post - has moved into Thomas Yeoman House in the Canal Basin after more than 50 years in its former Corporation Street headquarters.
In the middle of the 19th century, as the telegraph started to take hold, newspapers initially saw it as a threat before coming to a realization: It could actually transform the industry.
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For the first thirty-five years, the telegraph was the most important electrical industry, raising the possibility that it led electrification.
THE ship's telegraph - usually housed in a brass pedestal on the bridge - transformed communications on vessels as they grew in size.
A print deal worth 40 million British pounds "will make Northern Ireland one of the biggest producers of daily newspapers in Europe," according to a report in today's Belfast Telegraph.